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Changes In The Nature Of Urban Spatial Structure In The United States, 1890-2000

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  • Sukkoo Kim

Abstract

This paper documents the long-run trends in the average densities and density gradients of urban areas in the United States. The data show that between 1890 and 2000 the average densities of cities and metropolitan areas rose and fell but that the density gradients of urban areas generally declined monotonically over time. While it is beyond the scope of this paper to estimate the causes of these changes, this paper argues that a complete understanding of the changes in the nature of US urban spatial structures is likely to go beyond the standard explanations based on the monocentric city model such as decreases in transportation costs and increases in household incomes. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2007

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  • Sukkoo Kim, 2007. "Changes In The Nature Of Urban Spatial Structure In The United States, 1890-2000," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 273-287.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:47:y:2007:i:2:p:273-287
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alex Anas & Richard Arnott & Kenneth A. Small, 1998. "Urban Spatial Structure," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1426-1464.
    2. Peter Mieszkowski & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "The Causes of Metropolitan Suburbanization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 135-147, Summer.
    3. Sukkoo Kim, 2000. "Urban Development in the United States, 1690–1990," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 66(4), pages 855-880, April.
    4. Maureen Kilkenny, 1995. "Transport Costs and Rural Development," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 95-wp133, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    5. Fujita, Masahisa & Ogawa, Hideaki, 1982. "Multiple equilibria and structural transition of non-monocentric urban configurations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 161-196, May.
    6. Fujita,Masahisa, 1991. "Urban Economic Theory," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521396455, December.
    7. Kilkenny, Maureen, 1998. "Transport Costs, the New Economic Geography, and Rural Development," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1201, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Sukkoo Kim, 2002. "The Reconstruction of the American Urban Landscape in the Twentieth Century," NBER Working Papers 8857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Margo, Robert A., 1992. "Explaining the postwar suburbanization of population in the United States: The role of income," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 301-310, May.
    10. McDonald, John F., 1989. "Econometric studies of urban population density: A survey," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 361-385, November.
    11. Robert E. Lucas & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2002. "On the Internal Structure of Cities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1445-1476, July.
    12. Macauley, Molly K., 1985. "Estimation and recent behavior of urban population and employment density gradients," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 251-260, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zębik Grzegorz, 2011. "Typology of Suburban Communities in Poland," Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, De Gruyter Open, vol. 16(16), pages 173-188, January.
    2. Eric A. Hanushek & Kuzey Yilmaz, 2010. "Household Location and Schools in Metropolitan Areas with Heterogeneous Suburbs; Tiebout, Alonso, and Government Policy," NBER Working Papers 15915, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David Cuberes & Rafael González-Val, 2017. "The effect of the Spanish Reconquest on Iberian cities," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 58(3), pages 375-416, May.
    4. Courtney LaFountain, 2008. "Core equivalence for residential land use models," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 4(4), pages 459-481.
    5. Ikeda, Kiyohrio & Onda, Mikihisa & Takayama, Yuki, 2017. "Bifurcation theory of a square lattice economy: Racetrack economy analogy in an economic geography model," MPRA Paper 78120, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Duranton, Gilles & Puga, Diego, 2015. "Urban Land Use," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.

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