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Performance indicators: good, bad, and ugly

Author

Listed:
  • Sheila M. Bird
  • Cox Sir David
  • Vern T. Farewell
  • Goldstein Harvey
  • Holt Tim
  • Smith Peter C.

Abstract

A striking feature of UK public services in the 1990s was the rise of performance monitoring (PM), which records, analyses and publishes data in order to give the public a better idea of how Government policies change the public services and to improve their effectiveness. Copyright 2005 Royal Statistical Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Sheila M. Bird & Cox Sir David & Vern T. Farewell & Goldstein Harvey & Holt Tim & Smith Peter C., 2005. "Performance indicators: good, bad, and ugly," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(1), pages 1-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:168:y:2005:i:1:p:1-27
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Abramo, Giovanni & D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea & Grilli, Leonardo, 2015. "Funnel plots for visualizing uncertainty in the research performance of institutions," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 954-961.
    2. Isabella Sulis & Mariano Porcu, 2015. "Assessing Divergences in Mathematics and Reading Achievement in Italian Primary Schools: A Proposal of Adjusted Indicators of School Effectiveness," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 607-634, June.
    3. Dwyer, Rocky, 2009. "Effectiveness Measurement: When Will We Get It Right?," Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, Universidad ESAN, vol. 14(27), pages 63-71.
    4. Vainieri, Milena & Vola, Federico & Gomez Soriano, Gregorio & Nuti, Sabina, 2016. "How to set challenging goals and conduct fair evaluation in regional public health systems. Insights from Valencia and Tuscany Regions," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(11), pages 1270-1278.
    5. George Leckie & Harvey Goldstein, 2009. "The limitations of using school league tables to inform school choice," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 172(4), pages 835-851.
    6. Finn Førsund & Dag Edvardsen & Sverre Kittelsen, 2015. "Productivity of tax offices in Norway," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 269-279, June.
    7. Søgaard, Rikke & Kristensen, Søren Rud & Bech, Mickael, 2015. "Incentivising effort in governance of public hospitals: Development of a delegation-based alternative to activity-based remuneration," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(8), pages 1076-1085.
    8. Nazarov, Vladimir & Davis, Christopher Mark & Gerry, Christopher J. & Polyakova, Aleksandra & Sisigina, Natalia & Sokolov, D., 2015. "Evaluating the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Health System," Published Papers mn41, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    9. Kramarz, Francis & Machin, Stephen & Ouazad, Amine, 2008. "What Makes a Test Score? The Respective Contributions of Pupils, Schools, and Peers in Achievement in English Primary Education," IZA Discussion Papers 3866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Hezri, Adnan A. & Dovers, Stephen R., 2006. "Sustainability indicators, policy and governance: Issues for ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 86-99, November.
    11. Isabella Sulis & Mariano Porcu, 2012. "Comparing degree programs from students’ assessments: A LCRA-based adjusted composite indicator," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 21(2), pages 193-209, June.
    12. John Buckell & Andrew Smith & Roberta Longo & David Holland, 2013. "Health inefficiency and unobservable heterogeneity - empirical evidence from pathology services in the UK National Health Service," Working Papers 1307, Academic Unit of Health Economics, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds.
    13. Maria Cristiana Martini & Luigi Fabbris, 2017. "Beyond Employment Rate: A Multidimensional Indicator of Higher Education Effectiveness," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 130(1), pages 351-370, January.
    14. repec:bla:istatr:v:85:y:2017:i:2:p:355-370 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. María del Carmen Bas & Stefano Tarantola & José Miguel Carot & Andrea Conchado, 2017. "Sensitivity Analysis: A Necessary Ingredient for Measuring the Quality of a Teaching Activity Index," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 931-946, April.

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