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General-to-Specific Modelling Using PcGets

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  • P. Dorian Owen

Abstract

This review examines the facilities provided by PcGets version 1.0, an OxMetrics module designed to implement automated general-to-specific model selection in the context of cross-section or dynamic time-series models that are linear in the parameters. A cross-section empirical example is used to illustrate the steps involved, the output produced and the options available for modellers. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • P. Dorian Owen, 2003. "General-to-Specific Modelling Using PcGets," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(4), pages 609-628, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:17:y:2003:i:4:p:609-628
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    Cited by:

    1. Sai Ding & John Knight, 2011. "Why has China Grown So Fast? The Role of Physical and Human Capital Formation," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 73(2), pages 141-174, April.
    2. Evan Osborne, 2008. "Rivalries," Working Papers 0808, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    3. Gazi Mainul Hassan & Hisham M. Al refai, 2012. "Can macroeconomic factors explain equity returns in the long run? The case of Jordan," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(13), pages 1029-1041, July.
    4. repec:bla:reviec:v:25:y:2017:i:5:p:949-974 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:psl:pslqrr:2017:31 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Philip Liu, 2004. "Improving implementation of inflation targeting in New Zealand: an investigation of the Reserve Bank's inflation errors," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP 2004/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    7. David F. Hendry & Hans-Martin Krolzig, 2005. "The Properties of Automatic "GETS" Modelling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages 32-61, March.
    8. Ratna, Nazmun N. & Quentin Grafton, R. & Kompas, Tom, 2009. "Is diversity bad for economic growth?: Evidence from state-level data in the US," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 859-870, December.
    9. Blaise Gnimassoun, 2017. "Exchange rate misalignments and the external balance under a pegged currency system," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 949-974, November.
    10. Qin, Duo, 2008. "Uncover Latent PPP by Dynamic Factor Error Correction Model (DF-ECM) Approach: Evidence from Five OECD Countries," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 2, pages 1-26.
    11. Peter C. B. Phillips, 2003. "Laws and Limits of Econometrics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 26-52, March.
    12. Tran, Thi Bich & Grafton, R. Quentin & Kompas, Tom, 2009. "Institutions matter: The case of Vietnam," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 1-12, January.
    13. Gnimassoun, Blaise, 2015. "The importance of the exchange rate regime in limiting current account imbalances in sub-Saharan African countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 36-74.
    14. Rupa Duttagupta & Yan M Sun, 2008. "Price Dynamics in the Eastern Caribbean," IMF Working Papers 08/90, International Monetary Fund.
    15. John Knight & Sai Ding, 2008. "Why has China Grown so Fast? The Role of Structural Change," Economics Series Working Papers 415, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    16. Blaise Gnimassoun & Joseph Keneck, 2015. "Determinants of corruption: Can we put all countries in the same basket?," Working Papers of BETA 2015-31, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    17. Kevin S. Nell & A.P. Thirlwall, 2017. "Why does the productivity of investment vary across countries?," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 70(282), pages 213-245.

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