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The political economy of corruption and the role of economic opportunities

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  • Kira Boerner
  • Christa Hainz

Abstract

In many developing and transition countries, we observe rather high levels of corruption. We argue that the missing political support for anti-corruption policies is due to a lack of economic and financial reforms. Our model is based on the fact that corrupt officials have to pay entry fees to get lucrative positions. In a probabilistic voting model, we show that this, together with the lack of economic opportunities, makes anti-corruption policies less likely. Compared to a reformed economy, more voters are part of the corrupt system and, more importantly, rents from corruption are distributed differently. Economic liberalization increases the support for anti-corruption measures. The additional effect of financial liberalization is ambiguous. Copyright (c) 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2009 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Suggested Citation

  • Kira Boerner & Christa Hainz, 2009. "The political economy of corruption and the role of economic opportunities," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(2), pages 213-240, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:17:y:2009:i:2:p:213-240
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Belousova, Veronika & Rajeev, K. Goel & Korhonen, Iikka, 2011. "Causes of Corruption in Russia: A Disaggregated Analysis," Discussion Paper Series 557, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Driffield, Nigel L. & Mickiewicz, Tomasz & Temouri, Yama, 2013. "Institutional reforms, productivity and profitability: From rents to competition?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 583-600.
    3. Veronika Belousova & Rajeev Goel & Iikka Korhonen, 2016. "Corruption perceptions versus corruption incidence: Competition for rents across Russian regions," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(1), pages 172-187, January.
    4. Rajeev Goel & Jelena Budak & Edo Rajh, 2012. "Factors Driving Bribe Payments: Survey Evidence from Croatia," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 19(1), pages 13-22, September.
    5. Leone Leonida & Dario Maimone Ansaldo Patti & Pietro Navarra, 2013. "Testing the Political Replacement Effect: A Panel Data Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(6), pages 785-805, December.
    6. Majeed, Muhammad Tariq & MacDonald, Ronald, 2011. "Corruption and Financial Intermediation in a Panel of Regions: Cross-Border Effects of Corruption," SIRE Discussion Papers 2011-67, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. repec:eee:ecosys:v:41:y:2017:i:2:p:179-202 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:hhs:bofitp:2011_031 is not listed on IDEAS

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