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The Knowledge Production Function For University Patenting

Author

Listed:
  • SHIFERAW GURMU
  • GRANT C. BLACK
  • PAULA E. STEPHAN

Abstract

"We estimate a knowledge production function for university patenting using an individual effects negative binomial model. We control for Research and Development expenditures, research field, and the presence of a Technology Transfer Office. We distinguish between three kinds of researchers: faculty, postdoctoral scholars (postdocs), and PhD students. For the latter two, we also distinguish by visa status. We find patent counts to relate positively and significantly to the number of PhD students and number of postdocs. Our results also suggest that not all graduate students and postdocs contribute equally to patenting but that contribution is mediated by citizenship and visa status." (JEL C25, O31, O32, O34, O38) Copyright (c) 2008 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Shiferaw Gurmu & Grant C. Black & Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The Knowledge Production Function For University Patenting," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(1), pages 192-213, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:48:y:2010:i:1:p:192-213
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2008.00172.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hausman, Jerry & Hall, Bronwyn H & Griliches, Zvi, 1984. "Econometric Models for Count Data with an Application to the Patents-R&D Relationship," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(4), pages 909-938, July.
    2. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Stephan, Paula & Black, Grant C. & Chang, Tanwin, 2007. "The small size of the small scale market: The early-stage labor market for highly skilled nanotechnology workers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 887-892, July.
    4. Owen-Smith, Jason & Powell, Walter W, 2001. "To Patent or Not: Faculty Decisions and Institutional Success at Technology Transfer," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 26(1-2), pages 99-114, January.
    5. Murray, Fiona & Stern, Scott, 2007. "Do formal intellectual property rights hinder the free flow of scientific knowledge?: An empirical test of the anti-commons hypothesis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 648-687, August.
    6. Fiona E. Murray & Scott Stern, 2007. "Do Formal Intellectual Property Rights Hinder the Free Flow of Scientific Knowledge?: An Empirical Test of the Anti-Commons Hypothesis," NBER Chapters,in: Academic Science and Entrepreneurship: Dual Engines of Growth National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gnanaraj Chellaraj & Keith E. Maskus & Aaditya Mattoo, 2008. "The Contribution of International Graduate Students to US Innovation," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 444-462, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jeongsik Lee & Eric Stuen, 2016. "University reputation and technology commercialization: evidence from nanoscale science," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 586-609, June.
    2. John V. Winters, 2017. "Do Native STEM Graduates Increase Innovation? Evidence from U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Economics Working Paper Series 1714, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    3. Ejermo, Olof & Toivanen, Hannes, 2018. "University invention and the abolishment of the professor’s privilege in Finland," Papers in Innovation Studies 2018/6, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    4. Julien Pénin, 2009. "On the consequences of university patenting: What can we learn by asking directly to academic inventors?," Working Papers of BETA 2009-04, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    5. repec:kap:jtecht:v:43:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10961-015-9414-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Davide Antonioli & Francesco Nicolli & Laura Ramaciotti & Ugo Rizzo, 2016. "The Effect of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations on Academics’ Entrepreneurial Intention," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-18, November.
    7. Fouarge D. & Özer M.N., 2014. "International mobility of students – Its impact on labour market forecasts and its contribution to the Dutch economy," ROA Technical Report 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    8. Patrick Gaule & Mario Piacentini, 2015. "Immigration and Innovation: Chinese Graduate Students in U.S. Universities," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp529, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    9. Olof Ejermo & John Källström, 2016. "What is the causal effect of R&D on patenting activity in a “professor’s privilege” country? Evidence from Sweden," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 677-694, October.
    10. Olivier Brossard & Inès Moussa, 2014. "The French cluster policy put to the test with differences-in-differences estimates," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 520-529.
    11. Winters, John V., 2014. "Foreign and Native-Born STEM Graduates and Innovation Intensity in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 8575, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The "I"s Have It: Immigration and Innovation, the Perspective from Academe," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 83-127.
    13. Alexander Whalley & Justin Hicks, 2014. "Spending Wisely? How Resources Affect Knowledge Production In Universities," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 35-55, January.
    14. Kathleen Carroll & Lisa M. Dickson & Jane E. Ruseski, 2013. "Do Faculty Matter? Effects of Faculty Participation in University Decisions," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 13-06, UMBC Department of Economics.
    15. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0843-4 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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