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The 'Network Economy' and Models of the Employment Contract

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  • David Marsden

Abstract

The development of the 'network economy' and the project-based work challenge established methods of regulating employment relationships. There appears to be an unsatisfied demand for its greater use, especially among employers, and this may be blocked by the lack of suitable contractual forms. Project-based work seeks to retain some of the open-ended flexibility of the standard employment relationship in relation to its task content but not its duration. I argue that the success of the standard employment relationship stems from articulation of its psychological, economic/incentive, and legal aspects. As yet, this appears to be lacking for more transient forms of relationship. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • David Marsden, 2004. "The 'Network Economy' and Models of the Employment Contract," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 42(4), pages 659-684, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:42:y:2004:i:4:p:659-684
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edward P. Lazear & Paul Oyer, 2012. "Personnel Economics," Introductory Chapters,in: Robert Gibbons & John Roberts (ed.), The Handbook of Organizational Economics Princeton University Press.
    2. Marsden, David, 1999. "A Theory of Employment Systems: Micro-Foundations of Societal Diversity," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294221.
    3. Alice Lam, 2003. "Organizational Learning in Multinationals: R&D Networks of Japanese and US MNEs in the UK," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 673-703, May.
    4. Peter AUER & Sandrine CAZES, 2000. "The resilience of the long-term employment relationship: Evidence from the industrialized countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 139(4), pages 379-408, December.
    5. Edward P. Lazear, 1995. "Personnel Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262121883, January.
    6. Alice Lam, 2003. "Organisational Learning in Multinationals R&D networks of Japanese and U.S. MNEs in the U.K," DRUID Working Papers 03-03, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
    7. James M. Malcomson, 1997. "Contracts, Hold-Up, and Labor Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(4), pages 1916-1957, December.
    8. Robert Salais, 1989. "L'analyse économique des conventions du travail," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 40(2), pages 199-240.
    9. James C. Sesil & Maya K. Kroumova & Joseph R. Blasi & Douglas L. Kruse, 2002. "Broad-based Employee Stock Options in US 'New Economy' Firms," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 40(2), pages 273-294, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Battistini, 2006. "The Role of Inter-Group Relationships in Institutional Analysis," Department of Economics University of Siena 487, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    2. Heywood, John S. & Siebert, W. Stanley & Wei, Xiangdong, 2005. "High Performance Workplaces and Family Friendly Practices: Promises Made and Promises Kept," IZA Discussion Papers 1812, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Jochen Späth, 2013. "Non-standard Employment, Working Time Arrangements, Establishment Entry and Exit," IAW Discussion Papers 98, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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