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Economic Structure, Social Risks and the Challenges to Social Policy in Macau, China

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  • Bingqin Li
  • Zhonglu Zeng

Abstract

Welfare state is often perceived as a response to help people coping with shocks caused by economic down turn. However, as argued by Hamnett, welfare state can directly assist economic restructuring. Thus, social policies can be responses to unsatisfied social needs or be proactive measures to push for economic changes. Macau is in a somewhat special position in that policy-makers are aware that the economy has been excessively dependent on the gaming industry. The government prevent it from being hit by recess through economic restructuring. In this paper, we examine the current social spending pattern and the nature of the social security system in Macau and establish that social policy in Macau is largely reactive. To achieve economic restructuring, there needs to be more proactive measures to facilitate human development and more stress on social investment.

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  • Bingqin Li & Zhonglu Zeng, 2015. "Economic Structure, Social Risks and the Challenges to Social Policy in Macau, China," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(2), pages 383-398, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaps:v:2:y:2015:i:2:p:383-398
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/app5.80
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    5. Gough, Ian, 2001. "Globalization and regional welfare regimes: the East Asian case," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 43959, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    7. Sonny Lo, 2009. "Casino Capitalism and Its Legitimacy Impact on the Politico-administrative State in Macau," Journal of Current Chinese Affairs - China aktuell, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 38(1), pages 19-47.
    8. Chris Hamnett, 1996. "Social Polarisation, Economic Restructuring and Welfare State Regimes," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 33(8), pages 1407-1430, October.
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    10. Ian Holliday, 2000. "Productivist Welfare Capitalism: Social Policy in East Asia," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 48(4), pages 706-723, September.
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