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Valuing Wildlife Management: A Utah Deer Herd

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  • Keith, John E.
  • Lyon, Kenneth S.

Abstract

Managers of public wildlife resources generally are concerned with enhancing the quality of recreation by increasing wildlife through habitat manipulation. However, current recreation valuation studies have focused upon variables that are inappropriate for use in these management decisions. The economic criterion for these decisions should be the value of a change in the stock of the wildlife population compared to its cost. An estimate of such a value was made for the Oak Creek deer herd in Utah, using a household production function approach in an optimal control framework. The value of an additional deer in the herd was estimated to be approximately $40.00.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith, John E. & Lyon, Kenneth S., 1985. "Valuing Wildlife Management: A Utah Deer Herd," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 10(02), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:wjagec:32315
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/32315
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McConnell, Kenneth E. & Sutinen, Jon G., 1979. "Bioeconomic models of marine recreational fishing," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 127-139, June.
    2. Bockstael, Nancy E. & McConnell, Kenneth E., 1981. "Theory and estimation of the household production function for wildlife recreation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 199-214, September.
    3. Crutchfield, Stephen R., 1983. "A bioeconomic model of an international fishery," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 310-328, December.
    4. Lewis, T. R., 1975. "Optimal Resource Management Under Conditions of Uncertainty: The Case of an Ocean Fishery," Working Papers 104, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    5. Sandra S. Batie & Leonard Shabman, 1979. "Valuing Nonmarket Goods—Conceptual and Empirical Issues: Discussion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 61(5), pages 931-932.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tigran Melkonyan & Michael H. Taylor, 2013. "Regulatory Policy Design for Agroecosystem Management on Public Rangelands," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 95(3), pages 606-627.
    2. Jensen, Frank & Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl & Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark, 2016. "Designing hunting regulation under population uncertainty and self-reporting," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 157-171.
    3. Young, Ralph, 1991. "The Economic Significance of Environmental Resources: A Review of the Evidence," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 59(03), December.
    4. Huffaker, Ray G. & Wilen, James E. & Gardner, B. Delworth, 1990. "A Bioeconomic Livestock/ Wild Horse Trade-Off Mechanism For Conserving Public Rangeland Vegetation," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 15(01), July.
    5. Meyer, Kevin Michael, 2017. "Three essays on environmental and resource economics," ISU General Staff Papers 201701010800006585, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Herruzo, A.C. & Martínez-Jauregui, M. & Carranza, J. & Campos, P., 2016. "Commercial income and capital of hunting: an application to forest estates in Andalucía," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 53-61.
    7. Joseph Cooper, 1993. "A bioeconomic model for estimating the optimal level of deer and tag sales," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(6), pages 563-579, December.
    8. Kurt Schwabe & Peter Schuhmann & Roy Boyd & Khosrow Doroodian, 2001. "The Value of Changes in Deer Season Length: An Application of the Nested Multinomial Logit Model," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 19(2), pages 131-147, June.
    9. Timothy Park & John Loomis, 1996. "Joint estimation of contingent valuation survey responses," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(2), pages 149-162, March.

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