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Activities in Models of Recreational Demand

Author

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  • W. Bowman Cutter
  • Linwood Pendleton
  • J. R. DeShazo

Abstract

Economists have taken divergent approaches to incorporating on-site activities into their empirical specifications of site choice models. We develop a model that explicitly allows individuals to choose both on-site attributes and site activities. This model not only conditions the marginal value of site attributes on the choice of an activity, but also explicitly recovers the marginal rates of substitution across activities. This approach reduces biases in the welfare analysis of changes in site attributes when preferences for attributes depend upon the choice of activities undertaken at the site. We test hypotheses generated by our model by comparing rival models of demand for access to beaches in Costa Rica.

Suggested Citation

  • W. Bowman Cutter & Linwood Pendleton & J. R. DeShazo, 2007. "Activities in Models of Recreational Demand," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(3), pages 370-381.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:83:y:2007:i:3:p:370-381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yoshiaki Kaoru & V. Kerry Smith & Jin Long Liu, 1995. "Using Random Utility Models to Estimate the Recreational Value of Estuarine Resources," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(1), pages 141-151.
    2. A. Brett Hauber & George R. Parsons, 2000. "The Effect of Nesting Structure Specification on Welfare Estimation in a Random Utility Model of Recreation Demand: An Application to the Demand for Recreational Fishing," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 501-514.
    3. Therese C. Grijalva & Robert P. Berrens & Alok K. Bohara & Paul M. Jakus & W. Douglass Shaw, 2002. "Valuing the Loss of Rock Climbing Access in Wilderness Areas: A National-Level, Random-Utility Model," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(1), pages 103-120.
    4. Loomis, John B. & Gonzalez-Caban, Armando & Englin, Jeffrey E., 2001. "Testing For Differential Effects Of Forest Fires On Hiking And Mountain Biking Demand And Benefits," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.
    5. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132-132.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bujosa Bestard, Angel & Font, Antoni Riera, 2009. "Environmental diversity in recreational choice modelling," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 2743-2750, September.
    2. Chen, Min & Lupi, Frank, 2013. "Modeling Long Overnight Trips by Chaining Recreation Sites," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150489, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Ghimire, Ramesh & Green, Gary T. & Paudel, Krishna P. & Poudyal, Neelam C. & Cordell, H. Ken, 2017. "Visitors' Preferences for Freshwater Amenity Characteristics: Implications from the U.S. Household Survey," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 42(1), January.
    4. Chen, Min & Lupi, Frank, 2009. "Does economic endogeneity of site facilities in recreation demand models lead to statistical endogeneity?," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49449, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Chen, Min, 2009. "Does Economic Endogeneity of Site Facilities in Recreation Demand Models Lead to Statistical Endogeneity?," Graduate Research Masters Degree Plan B Papers 55808, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation

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