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Testing For Differential Effects Of Forest Fires On Hiking And Mountain Biking Demand And Benefits

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  • Loomis, John B.
  • Gonzalez-Caban, Armando
  • Englin, Jeffrey E.

Abstract

Surveys of visitors to National Forests in Colorado were conducted to determine whether different fire ages and presence of crown fires have different effects on hiking and mountain biking recreation visits and benefits. Actual and intended behavior data were combined using a count-data travel cost model. The intended behavior trip questions asked about changes in number of trips due to the presence of a high-intensity crown fire, prescribed fire, and a 20-year-old high-intensity fire at the area respondents were visiting. Using the estimated recreation demand function, years since a non-crown fire had statistically significant positive effect on the trip demand of hikers. In contrast, presence of crown fires had no statistically significant effect on the quantity of hiker trips, but had a significant and negative effect on mountain biking trips. Crown fires also had a large effect on the value per trip, with crown fires increasing the value per hiking trip but lowering the value per mountain biking trip.

Suggested Citation

  • Loomis, John B. & Gonzalez-Caban, Armando & Englin, Jeffrey E., 2001. "Testing For Differential Effects Of Forest Fires On Hiking And Mountain Biking Demand And Benefits," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(2), pages 1-15, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31049
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.31049
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/31049/files/26020508.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. W. Douglass Shaw & Peter Feather, 1999. "Possibilities for Including the Opportunity Cost of Time in Recreation Demand Systems," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 592-602.
    2. Englin, Jeffrey & Shonkwiler, J S, 1995. "Estimating Social Welfare Using Count Data Models: An Application to Long-Run Recreation Demand under Conditions of Endogenous Stratification and Truncation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 104-112, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lankia, Tuija & Huhtala, Anni, 2011. "Valuation of Trips to Second Homes in the Country: Do Environmental Attributes Matter?," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114405, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Garnache, Cloe & Lupi, Frank, 2018. "The Thomas Fire and the Effect of Wildfires on the Value of Recreation Services in Southern California," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274028, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Boxall, Peter C. & Englin, Jeffrey E., 2008. "Fire and Recreational Values in Fire-Prone Forests: Exploring an Intertemporal Amenity Function Using Pooled RP-SP Data," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 33(1), pages 1-15, April.
    4. Vladimir Otrachshenko & Luis C. Nunes, 2019. "Fire takes no vacation: impact of fires on tourism," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp632, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    5. Morey, Edward R. & Kritzberg, David, 2012. "It's not where you do it, it's who you do it with?," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 176-191.
    6. Massimo Filippini & William Greene & Adan L. Martinez-Cruz, 2018. "Non-market Value of Winter Outdoor Recreation in the Swiss Alps: The Case of Val Bedretto," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 71(3), pages 729-754, November.
    7. Dhakal, Bhubaneswor & Yao, Richard T. & Turner, James A. & Barnard, Tim, 2012. "Recreational users' willingness to pay and preferences for changes in planted forest features," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 34-44.
    8. Abdulbaki Bilgic & Wojciech Florkowski, 2009. "The impact of license regulation on the number of recreation trips: is it worth considering?," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 45-69, February.
    9. Rideout, Douglas B. & Ziesler, Pamela S. & Kling, Robert & Loomis, John B. & Botti, Stephen J., 2008. "Estimating rates of substitution for protecting values at risk for initial attack planning and budgeting," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 205-219, February.
    10. Pamela Wicker & John C. Whitehead & Bruce K. Johnson & Daniel S. Mason, 2017. "The effect of sporting success and management failure on attendance demand in the Bundesliga: a revealed and stated preference travel cost approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(52), pages 5287-5295, November.
    11. Richardson, Robert B. & Loomis, John B., 2004. "Adaptive recreation planning and climate change: a contingent visitation approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 83-99, September.
    12. Starbuck, C. Meghan & Berrens, Robert P. & McKee, Michael, 2006. "Simulating changes in forest recreation demand and associated economic impacts due to fire and fuels management activities," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 52-66, January.
    13. Woodall, Stacie & Wandschneider, Philip R. & Foltz, John C. & Taylor, R. Garth, 2002. "Valuing Idaho Wineries With A Travel Cost Model," 2002 Annual Meeting, July 28-31, 2002, Long Beach, California 36613, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    14. Hesseln, Hayley & Loomis, John B. & González-Cabán, Armando, 2004. "Comparing the economic effects of fire on hiking demand in Montana and Colorado," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 21-35, May.
    15. Marilena Furno & Francesco La Barbera & Fabio Verneau, 2019. "Accounting for the hypothetical bias: A changing adjustment factor approach," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(3), pages 329-342, July.
    16. Jan Špaček & Michaela Antoušková, 2013. "Individual single-site travel cost model for Czech paradise geopark," Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis, Mendel University Press, vol. 61(7), pages 2851-2858.
    17. Sánchez, José J. & Baerenklau, Ken & González-Cabán, Armando, 2016. "Valuing hypothetical wildfire impacts with a Kuhn–Tucker model of recreation demand," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 63-70.
    18. Davies, Stephen P. & Loomis, John B., 2006. "A New Approach to Correct for Hypothetical Bias in Stated Preference Models," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21204, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    19. Stetler, Kyle M. & Venn, Tyron J. & Calkin, David E., 2010. "The effects of wildfire and environmental amenities on property values in northwest Montana, USA," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(11), pages 2233-2243, September.
    20. Richardson, Robert B. & Loomis, John & Weiler, Stephan, 2006. "Recreation as a Spatial Good: Distance Effects on Changes in Recreation Visitation and Benefits," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 36(3), pages 362-380.
    21. W. Bowman Cutter & Linwood Pendleton & J. R. DeShazo, 2007. "Activities in Models of Recreational Demand," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(3), pages 370-381.
    22. Taylor, R. Garth & Woodall, Stacie & Wandschneider, Philip R. & Foltz, John C., 2004. "The Demand for Wine Tourism in Canyon County, Idaho," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 7(4), pages 1-18.
    23. John C. Whitehead & Pamela Wicker, 2018. "Valuing Non-Market Benefits of Participatory Sport Events Using Willingness to Travel: Payment Card vs Random Selection with Mitigation of Hypothetical Bias," Working Papers 18-06, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.

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