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Do In-Kind Benefits Influence Pharmacists’ Labor Supply Decisions?

  • Murphy, Sean M.
  • Friesner, Daniel L.
  • Scott, David M.
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    This paper explores whether in-kind benefits influence the labor supply decisions of pharmacists. Particular attention is paid to decisions to supply more than thirty hours of labor per week, when in-kind benefits are usually standard. A distinction is also made between pharmacists in managerial and/or ownership positions and those in traditional staff positions. Using survey data from registered pharmacists in North Dakota, we find that the labor supply determinants for owners/managers and employees are significantly different. We also find that while in-kind benefits do not appear to influence the typical staff pharmacist’s decision of how many hours to work each week, certain, but not all, types of these benefits do influence the decision of the representative owner/manager. Furthermore, the determinants of hours worked, in general, do not differ across the thirty hour per week threshold.

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    Article provided by Mid-Continent Regional Science Association in its journal Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:133143
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    1. Heckman, James J, 1978. "Dummy Endogenous Variables in a Simultaneous Equation System," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(4), pages 931-59, July.
    2. Dan Axelsen & Dan Friesner & Robert Rosenman & Hal Snarr, 2007. "Welfare recipient work choice and in-kind benefits in Washington state," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(8), pages 1021-1036.
    3. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
    4. Rosenman Robert & Friesner Daniel, 2004. "Commitment and Discretion in Health Care Policy Making," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-30, March.
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