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Migration Decision-making: A Hierarchical Regression Approach

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  • Chi, Guangqing
  • Voss, Paul

Abstract

While migration decision-making has long been studied using mover-stayer models and standard regression models, they do not well handle small- and large-scale heterogeneities (migration propensities). The hierarchical regression model can help solve this problem, because it deals with data organized hierarchically and studies variation at different levels of the hierarchy simultaneously. Using Wisconsin’s 5% Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) file from Census 2000 for a two-level hierarchy – individual/household level and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) level, we take a fresh look at how a hierarchical logit model can improve migration studies by including demographic, socio-economic, and biogeophysical factors. The findings indicate that the hierarchical regression approach provides significant advantages in studying migration decisionmaking.

Suggested Citation

  • Chi, Guangqing & Voss, Paul, 2005. "Migration Decision-making: A Hierarchical Regression Approach," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 0(Issue 2), pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132306
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula & Usha Nair-Reichert, 2012. "Migration and public policies: a further empirical analysis," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 36(1), pages 238-248, January.
    2. Cebula, Richard & Nair-Reichert, Usha & Coombs, Christopher, 2013. "Gross In-Migration and Public Policy in the U.S. during the Great Recession: An Exploratory Empirical Analysis, 2008-2009," MPRA Paper 55449, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga, 2014. "Life (dis)satisfaction and the intention to migrate: Evidence from Central and Eastern Europe," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 40-49.
    4. Durden, Garey C. & Gaynor, Patricia E., 2015. "Publishing in The Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy and an Evaluation (via Citation Counts) of JRAP’s Influence on Scholarship in Regional Science," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 0(Issue 2).
    5. Richard J. Cebula & Maggie Foley & Joshua C. Hall, 2016. "Freedom and gross in-migration: an empirical study of the post-great recession experience," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(2), pages 402-420, April.
    6. Richard J. Cebula & J. R. Clark, 2013. "An extension of the Tiebout hypothesis of voting with one's feet: the Medicaid magnet hypothesis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(32), pages 4575-4583, November.
    7. Richard J. Cebula & J.R. Clark, 2011. "Migration, Economic Freedom, and Personal Freedom: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 27(Fall 2011), pages 43-62.
    8. Cebula, Richard & Foley, Maggie & Hall, Joshua, 2012. "The Impact of Economic Freedom and Total Freedom on Gross State In-Migration: An Exploratory Study of the Great Recession Experience," MPRA Paper 55270, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Cebula, Richard & Nair-Reichert, Usha & Coombs, Christopher, 2013. "Total State In-Migration and Public Policy in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of the Great recession and the Pre- and Post-Great Recession Years," MPRA Paper 56484, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 02 Feb 2014.
    10. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0832-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Guangqing Chi & Jun Zhu, 2008. "Spatial Regression Models for Demographic Analysis," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(1), pages 17-42, February.
    12. Osawe, Osayanmon Wellington, 2013. "Livelihood Vulnerability and Migration Decision Making Nexus: The Case of Rural Farm Households in Nigeria," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161628, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    13. Richard Cebula, 2014. "The Impact of Economic Freedom and Personal Freedom on Net In-Migration in the U.S.: A State-Level Empirical Analysis, 2000 to 2010," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 88-103, March.

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