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Livelihood Vulnerability and Migration Decision Making Nexus: The Case of Rural Farm Households in Nigeria

Listed author(s):
  • Osawe, Osayanmon Wellington

This research is a desk-based study that examines the processes of migration decision-making and the livelihood vulnerability that rural farm households face in Nigeria. It focuses on the socio-economic and environmental factors such as how vulnerability at the household level interacts with the decision to migrate some members of the households to other destination using secondary data sources using the concept of household assets characteristics in explaining the link between livelihood vulnerability and migration decisions among rural households in Nigeria. The study argued that household assets mediate between the vulnerability that households experience and their decision to embark on migration as an alternative livelihood strategy and contrary to some findings, the study submitted that migration as a livelihood strategy of households is mainly used as an ex-ante risk management strategy-accumulation of assets rather than as an ex-post coping strategy to deal with stress or shocks confronting households.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/161628
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Paper provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE) in its series 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia with number 161628.

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Date of creation: 2013
Handle: RePEc:ags:aaae13:161628
Contact details of provider: Postal:
C/O University of Nairobi, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences (CAVS), Upper Kabete Campus, Loresho Ridge Rd. P.O. Box 63515 - 00619, Muthaiga, Nairobi, Kenya

Phone: +254 572 511 300
Web page: http://www.aaae-africa.org
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  1. Luc J. Christiaensen & Kalanidhi Subbarao, 2005. "Towards an Understanding of Household Vulnerability in Rural Kenya," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(4), pages 520-558, December.
  2. Kazianga, Harounan & Udry, Christopher, 2006. "Consumption smoothing? Livestock, insurance and drought in rural Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 413-446, April.
  3. Bryceson, Deborah Fahy, 2002. "The Scramble in Africa: Reorienting Rural Livelihoods," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 725-739, May.
  4. Case, Anne & Deaton, Angus, 1998. "Large Cash Transfers to the Elderly in South Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1330-1361, September.
  5. Glenn Fuguitt & David Brown, 1990. "Residential preferences and population redistribution: 1972–1988," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(4), pages 589-600, November.
  6. Makoka, Donald & Kaplan, Marcus, 2005. "Poverty and Vulnerability - An Interdisciplinary Approach," MPRA Paper 6964, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. World Bank, 2001. "World Development Report 2000/2001," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11856, April.
  8. Hoddinott, John & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2003. "Methods for microeconometric risk and vulnerability assessments," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 29138, The World Bank.
  9. Anjini Kochar, 1999. "Smoothing Consumption by Smoothing Income: Hours-of-Work Responses to Idiosyncratic Agricultural Shocks in Rural India," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(1), pages 50-61, February.
  10. Chi, Guangqing & Voss, Paul, 2005. "Migration Decision-making: A Hierarchical Regression Approach," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 35(2).
  11. Oluwatayo, I.B., 2004. "Income Risk and Welfare Status of Rural Households in Nigeria: Ekiti State as a Test Case," WIDER Working Paper Series 061, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  12. Alwang, Jeffrey & Siegel, Paul B. & Jorgensen, Steen L., 2001. "Vulnerability : a view from different disciplines," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 23304, The World Bank.
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