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Agricultural Cooperative Development in China and Vietnam since Decollectivization: A Multi-Stakeholder Approach

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  • Sultan, Tursinbek
  • Wolz, Axel

Abstract

Even before other socialist countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the former Soviet Union (FSU) had done so, China and Vietnam embarked on a decollectivization process, where collective farming was completely abolished and family farming re-emerged. When the CEE and FSU countries started farm restructuring during the early 1990s, the East Asian way seemed to be the model. Some countries followed suit, while others provided the legal basis for a competitive environment between various types of farm organizations. One vital feature, however, is the fact that agricultural service cooperatives, contrary to China and Vietnam, only play a marginal role in these countries. Though the farmers from China and Vietnam and from the CEE and FSU countries had equally bitter memories of their respective collective periods, we argue that additional stakeholders were decisive in cooperative development. This might be a vital factor for why agricultural production prospered so quickly.

Suggested Citation

  • Sultan, Tursinbek & Wolz, Axel, 2012. "Agricultural Cooperative Development in China and Vietnam since Decollectivization: A Multi-Stakeholder Approach," Journal of Rural Cooperation, Hebrew University, Center for Agricultural Economic Research, vol. 40(2), pages 1-21.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlorco:249598
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.249598
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/249598/files/09%20Agricultural%20Cooperative%20Development%20in%20China%20and%20Vietnam.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Qiao Liang & George Hendrikse & Zuhui Huang & Xuchu Xu, 2015. "Governance Structure of Chinese Farmer Cooperatives: Evidence From Zhejiang Province," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(2), pages 198-214, April.
    2. Liyan Yu & Jerker Nilsson, 2018. "Social capital and the financing performance of farmer cooperatives in Fujian Province, China," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 34(4), pages 847-864, October.

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    Keywords

    Farm Management; International Development;

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