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Food Expenditures by China's High-Income Households

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  • Gale, H. Frederick, Jr.

Abstract

"High-income" households in China had per-capita disposable incomes of just $2,637 during 2003, but their ownership of consumer durable goods suggests a standard of living putting them in the "middle class." Their expenditures on food away from home were sharply higher than those of other urban households. Quantities of beverages, dairy products, and poultry products purchased for at-home consumption were also significantly higher, but purchases of most other food products were only marginally higher. Higher per-unit expenditures for most items reflect greater demand for quality by high-income households.

Suggested Citation

  • Gale, H. Frederick, Jr., 2006. "Food Expenditures by China's High-Income Households," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 37(01), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlofdr:8567
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/8567
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Senauer, Benjamin & Goetz, Linde, 2003. "The Growing Middle Class In Developing Countries And The Market For High-Value Food Products," Working Papers 14331, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
    2. Dinghuan Hu & Thomas Reardon & Scott Rozelle & Peter Timmer & Honglin Wang, 2004. "The Emergence of Supermarkets with Chinese Characteristics: Challenges and Opportunities for China's Agricultural Development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22, pages 557-586, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Huang, Kuo S., 2007. "Demand For Food Quantity And Quality In China," Economic Research Report 7252, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Muhammad Ali & Syed Arifullah & Manzoor Hussain Memon, 2008. "Edible Oil Deficit and Its Impact on Food Expenditure in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 47(4), pages 531-546.

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