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Institutional Change and Plant Variety Provisions in Australia

Author

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  • Kingwell, Ross S.

Abstract

The science, funding and organisation of plant breeding in Australia has changed greatly since the 1980s. This paper explores the institutional change in plant variety provision in Australia. The roles of key economic and political agents are emphasized, along with the impact of changes in biotechnology and intellectual property rights. Their joint interaction has produced a set of complex agribusiness arrangements that underpin the current funding and supply of plant varieties. The pace of institutional change has been rapid and is uncovering a further set of agribusiness issues such as access to enabling biotechnologies, funder capture, contestability in pricing of varieties and access to royalty collection facilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Kingwell, Ross S., 2005. "Institutional Change and Plant Variety Provisions in Australia," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 0.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:auagre:126317
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/126317/files/Kingwell.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mullen, John D. & Vernon, Don & Fishpool, Ken I., 2000. "Agricultural extension policy in Australia: public funding and market failure," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 0(Issue 4), pages 1-17.
    2. Godden, David P., 1982. "Plant Variety Rights in Australia: Some Economic Issues," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 0(Number 01), pages 1-45, April.
    3. Fuglie, Keith O. & Walker, Thomas S., 2001. "Economic Incentives And Resource Allocation In U.S. Public And Private Plant Breeding," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-15, December.
    4. Lindner, Robert K., 2004. "Privatised provision of essential plant breeding infrastructure," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 0(Issue 2), pages 1-21.
    5. Andrew Dorward, 2001. "The Effects of Transaction Costs, Power and Risk on Contractual Arrangements: A Conceptual Framework for Quantitative Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 59-73.
    6. Pardey, Philip G. & Koo, Bonwoo & Nottenburg, Carol, 2004. "Creating, Protecting, And Using Crop Biotechnologies Worldwide In An Era Of Intellectual Property," Staff Papers 13600, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    7. Thirtle, C. & Bottomley, P. & Palladino, P. & Schimmelpfennig, D. & Townsend, R., 1998. "The rise and fall of public sector plant breeding in the United Kingdom: a causal chain model of basic and applied research and diffusion," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 127-143, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pardey, Philip G. & James, Jennifer S. & Alston, Julian M. & Wood, Stanley & Koo, Bonwoo & Binenbaum, Eran & Hurley, Terrance M. & Glewwe, Paul & Mayer, Jorge & Jones, Richard & De Groote, Hugo & Kana, 2007. "Science, Technology and Skills," Reports 136256, University of Minnesota, International Science and Technology Practice and Policy.
    2. Gray, Richard S. & Bolek, Katarzyna, 2012. "Grain Research Funding in Australia: Lessons from International Experience," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Fremantle, Australia 124176, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

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