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The Growing Prevalence of Emergency, Disaster, and Other Ad Hoc Farm Program Payments: Implications for Agri-Environmental and Conservation Programs

  • Smith, Katherine R.

The use of emergency, disaster, and other ad hoc sources of income support to American farmers escalated dramatically between 1991 and 2002, increasing year-to-year uncertainty about the magnitude and distribution of farm program benefits. Ad hoc payment mechanisms, while meeting needs now apparently unsatisfied by other farm programs, have the potential to substitute for or conflict with agri-environmental and conservation program goals. Federal budget constraints likely make continued growth in ad hoc payment schemes unsustainable, raising questions about what will take their place. There is ample room for new research on how alternative farm program approaches and program combinations interact to affect stewardship behavior and associated agri-environmental outcomes.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31380
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Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

Volume (Year): 33 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:31380
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.narea.org/

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  1. Chambers, Robert G. & Quiggin, John, 2000. "Decomposing Input Adjustments Under Price and Production Uncertainty," Working Papers 197863, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  2. Robert Innes, 2003. "Crop Insurance in a Political Economy: An Alternative Perspective on Agricultural Policy," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 318-335.
  3. Orden, David & Paarlberg, Robert & Roe, Terry, 1999. "Policy Reform in American Agriculture," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226632643.
  4. Quiggin, John, 1992. "Some observations on insurance, bankruptcy and input demand," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 101-110, June.
  5. JunJie Wu, 1999. "Crop Insurance, Acreage Decisions, and Nonpoint-Source Pollution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(2), pages 305-320.
  6. Claassen, Roger & Hansen, LeRoy T. & Peters, Mark & Breneman, Vincent E. & Weinberg, Marca & Cattaneo, Andrea & Feather, Peter & Gadsby, Dwight M. & Hellerstein, Daniel & Hopkins, Jeffrey W. & Johnsto, 2001. "Agri-Environmental Policy at the Crossroads: Guideposts on a Changing Landscape," Agricultural Economics Reports 33983, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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