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Welfare Effects of Anti-Sprawl Policies in the Presence of Urban Decline

Author

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  • Bento, Antonio M.
  • Franco, Sofia F.
  • Kaffine, Daniel T.

Abstract

This paper extends first-best analysis of anti-sprawl policies, such as development taxes, and examines the welfare effects of development taxes in the presence of urban decline at the city core. We find that anti-sprawl policies generate several important feedbacks within the urban system, generating additional welfare gains and affecting the level of urban decline and suburban sprawl. Further, the optimal development tax exceeds the (first-best) Pigouvian level, irrespective of whether or not revenues are returned lump-sum to all landowners or earmarked for urban decline mitigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Bento, Antonio M. & Franco, Sofia F. & Kaffine, Daniel T., 2011. "Welfare Effects of Anti-Sprawl Policies in the Presence of Urban Decline," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(3), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:120272
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Coisnon & Walid Oueslati & Julien Salanié, 2013. "Spatial targeting of agri-environmental policy and urban development," Post-Print halshs-00949730, HAL.
    2. Lynch, Lori & Geoghegan, Jacqueline, 2011. "FOREWORD: The Economics of Land Use Change: Advancing the Frontiers," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(3), December.
    3. Miriam Hortas-Rico, 2015. "Sprawl, Blight, And The Role Of Urban Containment Policies: Evidence From U.S. Cities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 298-323, March.
    4. Thomas Coisnon & Walid Oueslati & Julien Salanié, 2012. "Agri-environmental policy and urban sprawl patterns: A general equilibrium analysis," Working Papers halshs-00753221, HAL.

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