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The adoption of NERICA rice varieties at the initial stage of the diffusion process in Uganda

Author

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  • Kijima, Yoko
  • Sserunkuuma, Dick

Abstract

A new high-yielding upland rice variety known as New Rice for Africa (NERICA) has been recognised widely as a promising technology for addressing the food shortage and poverty problems in sub-Saharan Africa. This, however, is no guarantee for NERICA’s widespread adoption. This study attempts to assess the major determinants of the adoption of NERICA in the early stages of its diffusion in Uganda. Contrary to common belief, we found that asset endowment did not affect farmers’ adoption of NERICA. This is likely because of government intervention under a programme that promoted domestic rice production through the free distribution of seed or as in-kind credit, coupled with an absence of farmers’ investment in complementary inputs such as fertilizer and irrigation. However, as expected, membership in farmers’ groups increased the probability of adopting NERICA. The government programme promoting NERICA significantly increased its adoption rate, although the lack of extension services, training in post-harvest treatment and better management practices for rice cultivation limited the yield of and income from NERICA.

Suggested Citation

  • Kijima, Yoko & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2013. "The adoption of NERICA rice varieties at the initial stage of the diffusion process in Uganda," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:156984
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/156984
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yoko Kijima & Keijiro Otsuka & Dick Sserunkuuma, 2008. "Assessing the impact of NERICA on income and poverty in central and western Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 327-337, May.
    2. Timothy Conley & Udry Christopher, 2001. "Social Learning Through Networks: The Adoption of New Agricultural Technologies in Ghana," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 668-673.
    3. Reardon, Thomas & Crawford, Eric W. & Kelly, Valerie A. & Diagana, Bocar N., 1995. "Promoting Farm Investment for Sustainable Intensification of African Agriculture," Food Security International Development Papers 54053, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Pender, John & Jagger, Pamela & Nkonya, Ephraim & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2004. "Development Pathways and Land Management in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 767-792, May.
    5. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-1417, November.
    6. Yoko KIJIMA & Dick SSERUNKUUMA & Keijiro OTSUKA, 2006. "How Revolutionary Is The "Nerica Revolution"? Evidence From Uganda," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(2), pages 252-267.
    7. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tomonori Yokouchi & Kazuki Saito, 2016. "Factors affecting farmers’ adoption of NERICA upland rice varieties: the case of a seed producing village in central Benin," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 197-209, February.
    2. Tomonori Yokouchi & Kazuki Saito, 2016. "Factors affecting farmers’ adoption of NERICA upland rice varieties: the case of a seed producing village in central Benin," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 197-209, February.
    3. Dibba, Lamin & Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou & Nielsen, Thea, 0. "How Accessibility to Seeds Affects the Potential Adoption of an Improved Rice Variety: The Case of The New Rice for Africa (NERICA) in The Gambia," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.
    4. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0715-x is not listed on IDEAS

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