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Environment, irreversibility and optimal effluent standards

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  • Jou, Jyh-Bang

Abstract

The present article investigates the use of performance standards to correct environmental externalities. Each firm in an industry emits waste in the production process, and, in turn, the average waste emissions of the industry adversely affect the firm's productivity. The firm, which incurs sunk costs when employing capital to abate waste emissions, is uncertain about the efficiency of capital. The firm will underestimate environmental externalities and will therefore pollute more than is socially efficient. To correct this tendency, the regulator can set a limit on either emissions or the emission‐output ratio at the socially efficient level. The firm will invest more, produce more, and pollute less when the regulator implements the former than when the regulator implements the latter.

Suggested Citation

  • Jou, Jyh-Bang, 2004. "Environment, irreversibility and optimal effluent standards," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 48(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:117864
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/117864
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Mohtadi, Hamid, 1996. "Environment, growth, and optimal policy design," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 119-140, December.
    6. Jung, Chulho & Krutilla, Kerry & Boyd, Roy, 1996. "Incentives for Advanced Pollution Abatement Technology at the Industry Level: An Evaluation of Policy Alternatives," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 95-111, January.
    7. Cropper, Maureen L & Oates, Wallace E, 1992. "Environmental Economics: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 675-740, June.
    8. Montero, Juan-Pablo, 2002. "Permits, Standards, and Technology Innovation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 23-44, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jou, Jyh-Bang & Lee, Tan (Charlene), 2016. "How does statutory redemption affect a buyer's decision at the foreclosure sale?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 263-272.
    2. Lee, Tan & Jou, Jyh-Bang, 2007. "The regulation of optimal development density," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 21-36, March.
    3. Zhen Zhang & Joshua Hinger & David Audretsch & Guojun Song, 2015. "Environmental technology transfer and emission standards for industry in China," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(5), pages 743-759, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

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