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The impact of private sector credit on income inequalities in European Union (15 member states)

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  • Ionuţ JIANU

    (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania)

Abstract

This paper aims to provide a comprehensive analysis on the income inequalities recorded in the EU-15 in the 1995-2014 period and to estimate the impact of private sector credit on income disparities. In order to estimate the impact, I used the panel data technique with 15 cross-sections for the first 15 Member States of the European Union, applying generalized error correction model.

Suggested Citation

  • Ionuţ JIANU, 2017. "The impact of private sector credit on income inequalities in European Union (15 member states)," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(2(611), S), pages 61-74, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:agr:journl:v:xxiv:y:2017:i:2(611):p:61-74
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    References listed on IDEAS

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