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Corruption and bureaucracy in public services

Author

Listed:
  • Luminiţa Ionescu

    () (Academia Romana, Scoala Postodoctorala SPODE/ Spiru Haret University, Bucharest, Romania)

  • George Lăzăroiu

    (Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities and Social Studies, New York/ Spiru Haret University, Bucharest, Romania)

  • Gheorghe Iosif

    (Media and Publishing Group "Economic Tribune")

Abstract

The theory that we shall seek to elaborate here puts considerable emphasis on the importance of big-time corruption in reducing funding for service delivery, the value of bureaucracy as a means of delivering public services, and the level of politicization of the public bureaucracy. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the current literature by examining different aspects of the benefits of openness and transparency in tackling corruption in the public sector, the bureaucratization of service tasks, and the failure of bureaucratic systems in delivering public services. In sum, the results of the current paper provide useful insights on the context and causes of corruption, incentives to assure efficiency within the public bureaucracy, and the organizational limits of public bureaucracy.

Suggested Citation

  • Luminiţa Ionescu & George Lăzăroiu & Gheorghe Iosif, 2012. "Corruption and bureaucracy in public services," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 14(Special N), pages 665-679, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:aes:amfeco:v:14:y:2012:i:special_no_6:p:665-679
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    File URL: http://www.amfiteatrueconomic.ro/temp/Article_1158.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jac C Heckelman & Benjamin Powell, 2010. "Corruption and the Institutional Environment for Growth," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 52(3), pages 351-378, September.
    2. Alois Stutzer, 2008. "Bureaucratic Rents and Life Satisfaction," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 476-488, October.
    3. James P. Gander, 2011. "Microeconomics of Corruption Among Developing Economies," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2011_01, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    4. Christopher Coyne, 2008. "The Politics of Bureaucracy and the failure of post-war reconstruction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 135(1), pages 11-22, April.
    5. Eric M. Uslaner, 2011. "Corruption and Inequality," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 9(2), pages 20-24, 07.
    6. Nathan M Jensen & Quan Li & Aminur Rahman, 2010. "Understanding corruption and firm responses in cross-national firm-level surveys," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 41(9), pages 1481-1504, December.
    7. Jakob Svensson, 2005. "Eight Questions about Corruption," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(3), pages 19-42, Summer.
    8. Rick Stapenhurst & Niall Johnston & Riccardo Pelizzo, 2006. "The Role of Parliaments in Curbing Corruption," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7106.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cosmin Marinescu, 2013. "Institutional Quality of the Business Environment: Some European Practices in a Comparative Analysis," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 15(33), pages 270-287, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; bureaucracy; public service delivery;

    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • H89 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Other

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