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Corruption and Cheating: Evidence from Rural Thailand

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  • Olaf Hübler
  • Melanie Koch
  • Lukas Menkhoff
  • Ulrich Schmidt

Abstract

This study tests the prediction that perceived corruption reduces ethical behavior. Integrating a standard “cheating” experiment into a broad household survey in rural Thailand, we find clear support for this prediction: respondents who perceive corruption in state affairs are more likely to cheat and, thus, to fortify the negative consequences of corruption. Interestingly, there is a small group of non-conformers. The main relation is robust to consideration of socio-demographic, attitudinal, and situational control variables. Attendance of others at the cheating experiment, stimulating the reputational concern to be seen as honest, reduces cheating, thus indicating transparency as a remedy.

Suggested Citation

  • Olaf Hübler & Melanie Koch & Lukas Menkhoff & Ulrich Schmidt, 2020. "Corruption and Cheating: Evidence from Rural Thailand," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1917, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1917
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; cheating; individual characteristics; lab-in-the-field experiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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