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Symposium on Global Climate Change

Author

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  • Richard Schmalensee

Abstract

Global climate change, and policies to slow it or adapt to it, may be among the primary forces shaping the world's economy throughout the next century and beyond. Nonetheless, popular treatments of this issue commonly ignore economics. This introductory essay sketches some of the uncertainties and research questions.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Schmalensee, 1993. "Symposium on Global Climate Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 3-10, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:7:y:1993:i:4:p:3-10
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.7.4.3
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.7.4.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan Manne & Richard Richels, 1992. "Buying Greenhouse Insurance: The Economic Costs of CO2 Emission Limits," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026213280x, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. William Gissy, 1998. "Do environmental treaties matter?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 4(4), pages 411-417, November.
    2. Aida Nefzi Bouzidi, 2009. "Gestion du problème de changement climatique," Post-Print hal-00476277, HAL.
    3. Robinson, James A. & Srinivasan, T.N., 1993. "Long-term consequences of population growth: Technological change, natural resources, and the environment," Handbook of Population and Family Economics,in: M. R. Rosenzweig & Stark, O. (ed.), Handbook of Population and Family Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1175-1298 Elsevier.
    4. Gulli, Francesco, 2006. "Small distributed generation versus centralised supply: a social cost-benefit analysis in the residential and service sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 804-832, May.
    5. B. Stephen Labson, 1996. "International Response to Greenhouse Gas Abatement," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 3(2), pages 177-184.
    6. Eduardo Ley., "undated". "Public-good productivity differentials and non-cooperative public-good provision," Working Papers 97-02, FEDEA.
    7. Gullì, F., 2003. "Distributed Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0336, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. repec:kap:iaecre:v:4:y:1998:i:4:p:411-417 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Gulli, Francesco, 2006. "Social choice, uncertainty about external costs and trade-off between intergenerational environmental impacts: The emblematic case of gas-based energy supply decentralization," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 282-305, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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