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The Three Arab Worlds

Author

Listed:
  • James E. Rauch
  • Scott Kostyshak

Abstract

Given the attention currently focused on the Arab world in part as a result of adjustments in U.S. foreign policy, a fresh look at Arab socioeconomic performance is in order. The Arab world is defined by language rather than ethnicity. The League of Arab States, formed in 1945, consists of all countries in which (a dialect of) Arabic is the spoken language of the majority. It is useful to compare the human development diversity of the Arab world to that of Latin America, another vast geographic area defined by language and culture. Our strategy in this article is therefore to disaggregate the Arab world into Arab sub-Saharan Africa, Arab fuel-endowed economies, and a remainder we call the Arab Mediterranean, and to compare these three Arab worlds to non-Arab sub-Saharan Africa, non-Arab fuel endowed economies, and the rest of the non-Arab world. We will evaluate Arab socioeconomic progress from 1970 to as close to the present as the data allow.

Suggested Citation

  • James E. Rauch & Scott Kostyshak, 2009. "The Three Arab Worlds," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(3), pages 165-188, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:23:y:2009:i:3:p:165-88
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.23.3.165
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.23.3.165
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ali Fakih & Pascal L. Ghazalian, 2013. "Female Labour Force Participation in MENA's Manufacturing Sector: The Implications of Firm-related and National Factors," CIRANO Working Papers 2013s-46, CIRANO.
    2. Jahan-Parvar, Mohammad R. & Waters, George A., 2010. "Equity price bubbles in the Middle Eastern and North African Financial markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 39-48, March.
    3. Ali Fakih & Pascal L. Ghazalian, 2013. "Female Labour Force Participation in MENA's Manufacturing Sector: The Implications of Firm-related and National Factors," CIRANO Working Papers 2013s-46, CIRANO.
    4. Ali Fakih & Pascal Ghazalian, 2015. "Female employment in MENA’s manufacturing sector: the implications of firm-related and national factors," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 37-69, February.
    5. Nadereh Chamlou & Silvia Muzi & Hanane Ahmed, 2011. "Understanding the Determinants of Female Labor Force Participation in the Middle East and North Africa Region: The Role of Education and Social Norms in Amman," Working Papers 31, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    6. Radek Szulga, 2014. "A Dynamic Model of Female Labor Force Participation Rate and Human Capital Investment," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 81-114, September.
    7. James E. Rauch & Scott Kostyshak, 2014. "The three Arab worlds on the eve of the ‘Arab Spring’," Chapters,in: Handbook on Islam and Economic Life, chapter 30, pages iii-iii Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • P40 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - General

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