IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aejpol/v5y2013i2p148-87.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Evaluating US Fuel Economy Standards in a Model with Producer and Household Heterogeneity

Author

Listed:
  • Mark R. Jacobsen

Abstract

This paper employs an empirically estimated model to study the equilibrium effects of an increase in the US corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards. I identify and model heterogeneity across firms and find that the profit impacts of CAFE fall almost entirely on domestic producers. The welfare analyses consider the simultaneous household decision of vehicle and miles traveled, allowing direct comparison with a gasoline tax. Finally, I consider dynamic impacts in the used car market. I find these comprise nearly half the gross welfare cost of CAFE and fall disproportionately on low-income households. Contrary to previous results, the overall welfare costs are regressive. (JEL H24, L51, L62)

Suggested Citation

  • Mark R. Jacobsen, 2013. "Evaluating US Fuel Economy Standards in a Model with Producer and Household Heterogeneity," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 148-187, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:5:y:2013:i:2:p:148-87
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/pol.5.2.148
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/pol.5.2.148
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aej/pol/data/2011-0098_data.zip
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ian W. H. Parry & Margaret Walls & Winston Harrington, 2007. "Automobile Externalities and Policies," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 373-399, June.
    2. Austin, David & Dinan, Terry, 2005. "Clearing the air: The costs and consequences of higher CAFE standards and increased gasoline taxes," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 562-582, November.
    3. Soren T. Anderson & James M. Sallee, 2011. "Using Loopholes to Reveal the Marginal Cost of Regulation: The Case of Fuel-Economy Standards," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(4), pages 1375-1409, June.
    4. Kenneth A. Small & Kurt Van Dender, 2007. "Fuel Efficiency and Motor Vehicle Travel: The Declining Rebound Effect," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 25-52.
    5. West, Sarah E., 2004. "Distributional effects of alternative vehicle pollution control policies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 735-757, March.
    6. Thomas Klier & Joshua Linn, 2012. "New‐vehicle characteristics and the cost of the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 43(1), pages 186-213, March.
    7. Goldberg, Pinelopi Koujianou, 1998. "The Effects of the Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency Standards in the US," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 1-33, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Leard, Benjamin & McConnell, Virginia, 2015. "New Markets for Pollution and Energy Efficiency: Credit Trading under Automobile Greenhouse Gas and Fuel Economy StandardsAbstract: Recent changes to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard," Discussion Papers dp-15-16, Resources For the Future.
    2. repec:eee:resene:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:74-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Joshua Linn, 2016. "The Rebound Effect for Passenger Vehicles," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    4. Klier, Thomas & Linn, Joshua, 2013. "Technological Change, Vehicle Characteristics, and the Opportunity Costs of Fuel Economy Standards," Discussion Papers dp-13-40, Resources For the Future.
    5. repec:eee:ecolet:v:160:y:2017:i:c:p:20-23 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:resene:v:49:y:2017:i:c:p:99-112 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ran Wang & Weiwei Yang, 2016. "How Cafe Influences Auto Firms And Consumers? -Using Evidence From U.S. Market," Eurasian Journal of Economics and Finance, Eurasian Publications, vol. 4(3), pages 85-99.
    8. Liu, Weiwei, 2015. "Gasoline taxes or efficiency standards? A heterogeneous household demand analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 54-64.
    9. Linn, Joshua, 2013. "The Rebound Effect for Passenger Vehicles," Discussion Papers dp-13-19-rev, Resources For the Future.
    10. Cristina Cattaneo, 2018. "Internal and External Barriers to Energy Efficiency: Made-to-Measure Policy Interventions," Working Papers 2018.08, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    11. Arlan Brucal & Michael Roberts, 2016. "Do Energy Efficiency Standards Hurt Consumers? Evidence from Household Appliance Sales," Working Papers 201625, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    12. Arik Levinson, 2017. "Energy Efficiency Standards Are More Regressive Than Energy Taxes: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers gueconwpa~17-17-01, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    13. Arlan Brucal & Michael Roberts, 2015. "Can Energy Efficiency Standards Reduce Prices and Improve Quality? Evidence from the US Clothes Washer Market," Working Papers 2015-5, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    14. Klier, Thomas & Linn, Joshua, 2016. "The effect of vehicle fuel economy standards on technology adoption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 41-63.
    15. Kenneth Gillingham & Anders Munk-Nielsen, 2016. "A Tale of Two Tails: Commuting and the Fuel Price Response in Driving," NBER Working Papers 22937, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Arik Levinson, 2017. "Environmental Protectionism: The Case of CAFE," Working Papers gueconwpa~17-17-02, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    17. Chugh, Randy & Cropper, Maureen, 2017. "The welfare effects of fuel conservation policies in a dual-fuel car market: Evidence from India," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 244-261.
    18. repec:eee:rensus:v:81:y:2018:i:p1:p:1166-1174 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Cohen, François & Glachant, Matthieu & Söderberg, Magnus, 2017. "Consumer myopia, imperfect competition and the energy efficiency gap: Evidence from the UK refrigerator market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 1-23.
    20. Kenneth A. Small, 2017. "The Elusive Effects of CAFE Standards," Working Papers 171803, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    21. De Borger, Bruno & Mulalic, Ismir & Rouwendal, Jan, 2016. "Substitution between cars within the household," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 135-156.
    22. Grigolon, Laura & Reynaert, Mathias & Verboven, Frank, 2014. "Consumer valuation of fuel costs and the effectiveness of tax policy: Evidence from the European car market," CEPR Discussion Papers 10301, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    23. Arik Levinson, 2016. "Energy Efficiency Standards Are More Regressive Than Energy Taxes: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 22956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. West, Jeremy & Hoekstra, Mark & Meer, Jonathan & Puller, Steven L., 2017. "Vehicle miles (not) traveled: Fuel economy requirements, vehicle characteristics, and household driving," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 65-81.
    25. Pavan, Giulia, 2017. "Green Car Adoption and the Supply of Alternative Fuels," TSE Working Papers 17-875, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • L62 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Automobiles; Other Transportation Equipment; Related Parts and Equipment

    Lists

    This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
    1. Evaluating US Fuel Economy Standards in a Model with Producer and Household Heterogeneity (AEJ:EP 2013) in ReplicationWiki

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:5:y:2013:i:2:p:148-87. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.