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Intrahousehold Allocation of Free and Purchased Mosquito Nets

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  • Vivian Hoffmann

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Vivian Hoffmann, 2009. "Intrahousehold Allocation of Free and Purchased Mosquito Nets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 236-241, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:236-41
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.236
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jessica Cohen & Pascaline Dupas, 2008. "Free Distribution or Cost-Sharing? Evidence from a Malaria Prevention Experiment," NBER Working Papers 14406, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Nava Ashraf & James Berry & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2010. "Can Higher Prices Stimulate Product Use? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Zambia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2383-2413, December.
    3. Hoffmann, Vivian & Barrett, Christopher B. & Just, David R., 2009. "Do Free Goods Stick to Poor Households? Experimental Evidence on Insecticide Treated Bednets," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 607-617, March.
    4. Hoffmann, Vivian, 2008. "Psychology, Gender, and the Intrahousehold Allocation of Free and Purchased Mosquito Nets," Working Papers 55282, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bensch, Gunther & Peters, Jörg, 2017. "One-off subsidies and long-run adoption: Experimental evidence on improved cooking stoves in Senegal," Ruhr Economic Papers 685, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Fischer, Gregory & Berry, James & Guiteras, Raymond, 2012. "Eliciting and utilizing willingness to pay: evidence from field trials in Northern Ghana," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 47913, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Garg, Teevrat, 2014. "Public Health Effects of Natural Resource Degradation: Evidence from Indonesia," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169822, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Keefer, Philip & Khemani, Stuti, 2014. "Radio's impact on preferences for patronage benefits," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6932, The World Bank.
    5. Hassen, Sied & Köhlin, Gunnar, 2017. "Does purchase price matter for the waiting time to start using energy efficient technologies: Experimental evidence from rural Ethiopia?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 133-140.
    6. Jessica Cohen & Pascaline Dupas, 2008. "Free Distribution or Cost-Sharing? Evidence from a Malaria Prevention Experiment," NBER Working Papers 14406, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Pan, Yao & Singhal, Saurabh, 2019. "Agricultural extension, intra-household allocation and malaria," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 157-170.
    8. Günther Fink & Margaret McConnell & Sebastian Vollmer, 2014. "Testing for heterogeneous treatment effects in experimental data: false discovery risks and correction procedures," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 44-57, January.
    9. Dizon-Ross, Rebecca & Dupas, Pascaline & Robinson, Jonathan, 2017. "Governance and the effectiveness of public health subsidies: Evidence from Ghana, Kenya and Uganda," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 150-169.
    10. Castilla, Carolina, 2010. "Intra-Household Resource Management Structure and Income-Hiding under Incomplete Information," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61607, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Keefer, Philip & Khemani, Stuti, 2012. "Do informed citizens receive more...or pay more ? the impact of radio on the government distribution of public health benefits," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5952, The World Bank.
    12. Grant Miller & A. Mushfiq Mobarak, 2013. "Gender Differences in Preferences, Intra-Household Externalities, and Low Demand for Improved Cookstoves," NBER Working Papers 18964, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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