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Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly: Reply


  • Mark J. Kamstra
  • Lisa A. Kramer
  • Maurice D. Levi


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  • Mark J. Kamstra & Lisa A. Kramer & Maurice D. Levi, 2002. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1257-1263, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:92:y:2002:i:4:p:1257-1263 Note: DOI: 10.1257/00028280260344795

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lisa A. Kramer & Mark J. Kamstra & Maurice D. Levi, 2000. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1005-1011, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Kuehnle & Christoph Wunder, 2016. "Using the Life Satisfaction Approach to Value Daylight Savings Time Transitions: Evidence from Britain and Germany," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 2293-2323, December.
    2. Dowling, Michael & Lucey, Brian M., 2005. "Weather, biorhythms, beliefs and stock returns--Some preliminary Irish evidence," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 337-355.
    3. Jin, Lawrence & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2015. "Does Daylight Saving Time Really Make Us Sick?," IZA Discussion Papers 9088, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Andrew C. Worthington, 2003. "Losing Sleep At The Market: An Empirical Note On The Daylight Saving Anomaly In Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 22(3), pages 85-95, September.
    5. Jin, L. & Ziebarth, N.R., 2015. "Sleep and Human Capital: Evidence from Daylight Saving Time," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/27, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Matthew J. Kotchen & Laura E. Grant, 2011. "Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1172-1185, November.
    7. Rayenda Khresna Brahmana & Chee-Wooi Hooy & Zamri Ahmad, 2012. "Psychological factors on irrational financial decision making: Case of day-of-the week anomaly," Humanomics: The International Journal of Systems and Ethics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 236-257, October.
    8. Dowling, Michael & Lucey, Brian M., 2008. "Robust global mood influences in equity pricing," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 145-164, April.
    9. Andrew Worthington, 2003. "Business expectations and preferences regarding the introduction of daylight saving in Queensland," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 145, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    10. Müller, Luisa & Schiereck, Dirk & Simpson, Marc W. & Voigt, Christian, 2009. "Daylight saving effect," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 127-138, April.
    11. Steigerwald, Douglas G & Conte, Marc, 2007. "Do Daylight-Saving Time Adjustments Really Impact Stock Returns?," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt3kd37630, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.

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