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Daylight saving effect

Author

Listed:
  • Müller, Luisa
  • Schiereck, Dirk
  • Simpson, Marc W.
  • Voigt, Christian

Abstract

Kamstra et al. [Kamstra, M.J., Kramer, L.A., Levi, M.D., 2000. Losing sleep at the market: the daylight saving anomaly. The American Economic Review 90, 1005-1011] argue that the mean weekend return following the changes in daylight saving time is less than the mean weekend return throughout the rest of the year. Opposing studies, such as Pinegar [Pinegar, J.M., 2002. Losing sleep at the market: comment. The American Economic Review 92, 1251-1256), reason that the observed results depend upon methodology. We extend the ongoing discussions by providing further evidence for equity markets and bond markets in Germany and across Europe. We further demonstrate that the daylight saving effect does not serve as a potential rationale for the weekend effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Müller, Luisa & Schiereck, Dirk & Simpson, Marc W. & Voigt, Christian, 2009. "Daylight saving effect," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 127-138, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:mulfin:v:19:y:2009:i:2:p:127-138
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lisa A. Kramer & Mark J. Kamstra & Maurice D. Levi, 2000. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1005-1011, September.
    2. Reinhold Lamb & Richard Zuber & John Gandar, 2004. "Don't lose sleep on it: a re-examination of the daylight savings time anomaly," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 443-446.
    3. J. Michael Pinegar, 2002. "Losing Sleep at the Market: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1251-1256, September.
    4. French, Kenneth R., 1980. "Stock returns and the weekend effect," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 55-69, March.
    5. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
    6. Mark J. Kamstra & Lisa A. Kramer & Maurice D. Levi, 2002. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1257-1263, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2016. "Does Daylight Saving Save Energy? A Meta-Analysis," MPRA Paper 74518, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Karasu, Servet, 2010. "The effect of daylight saving time options on electricity consumption of Turkey," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 3773-3782.
    3. Tomas Havranek, Dominik Herman, and Zuzana Irsova, 2018. "Does Daylight Saving Save Electricity? A Meta-Analysis," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    4. Kudela, Peter & Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2020. "Does daylight saving time save electricity? Evidence from Slovakia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    5. Mirza, Faisal Mehmood & Bergland, Olvar, 2011. "The impact of daylight saving time on electricity consumption: Evidence from southern Norway and Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3558-3571, June.
    6. Tihana Škrinjarić & Branka Marasović & Boško Šego, 2021. "Does the Croatian Stock Market Have Seasonal Affective Disorder?," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 14(2), pages 1-16, February.

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