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The Life-Cycle Profile of Time Spent on Job Search

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Aguiar
  • Erik Hurst
  • Loukas Karabarbounis

Abstract

Using time use survey data we document a hump-shaped profile of job search time in the United States across the life-cycle. The middle-aged unemployed spend roughly three times as much time in job search as the youngest group of unemployed. The hump-shaped profile of job search time is relatively stable across demographic groups. However, the profile of job search time appears to be declining in non-US countries. We discuss how standard life-cycle models with incomplete markets have difficulty in accounting for the hump-shaped profile found in the US data.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst & Loukas Karabarbounis, 2013. "The Life-Cycle Profile of Time Spent on Job Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 111-116, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:103:y:2013:i:3:p:111-16
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.3.111
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Harley Frazis & Jay Stewart, 2005. "Data Watch: The American Time Use Survey," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 221-232, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ichino, Andrea & Schwerdt, Guido & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf & Zweimüller, Josef, 2017. "Too old to work, too young to retire?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 14-29.
    2. Francesca Carta & Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Female employment and pre-kindergarten: On the unintended effects of an Italian reform Abstract: We theoretically show that when mothers need to buy childcare services not only if they work but also i," Working Papers 091, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    3. Francesca Carta & Lucia Rizzica, 2015. "Female employment and pre-kindergarten: on the uninteded effects of an Italian reform," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1030, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Ichino, Andrea & Schwerdt, Guido & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf & Zweimüller, Josef, 2013. "Too Old to Work, Too Young to Retire? Revised Version of Working Paper 220, Economics Series, October 2007," Economics Series 302, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    5. Nicola Pavoni & Ofer Setty & Giovanni Violante, 2016. "The design of 'soft' welfare-to-work programs," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 20, pages 160-180, April.
    6. Peter Cappelli & Monika Hamori, 2013. "Who Says Yes When the Headhunter Calls? Understanding Executive Job Search Behavior," NBER Working Papers 19295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Papp, Tamás K., 2015. "The structure of labor market flows," Economics Series 318, Institute for Advanced Studies.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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