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The job satisfaction of English academics and their intentions to quit academe

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Author Info

  • Philip Stevens

    (National Institute of Economic & Social Research)

Abstract

This paper considers the job satisfaction of academics using a detailed dataset of over two thousand academics from ten English higher education institutions. The results of our analysis suggest that one would be wrong to consider one single measure of job-satisfaction. Academics appear to be considering three separate sets of elements of their jobs, namely the pecuniary factors (both the salary and the ability to earn money from additional work. We also consider the influence of these elements of job satisfaction on their intentions to leave the sector.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/lab/papers/0512/0512005.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0512005.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 06 Dec 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0512005

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 40
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Satisfaction; academics; turnover; comparison income;

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References

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  1. Arnaud Chevalier & Reamonn Lydon, 2002. "Estimates of the Effect of Wages on Job Satisfaction," CEP Discussion Papers dp0531, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Ward, Melanie E & Sloane, Peter J, 2000. "Non-pecuniary Advantages versus Pecuniary Disadvantages; Job Satisfaction among Male and Female Academics in Scottish Universities," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 47(3), pages 273-303, August.
  3. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1994. "Satisfaction and comparison income," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9408, CEPREMAP.
  4. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 223-242, May.
  5. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-90, October.
  6. repec:ese:iserwp:99-17 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Clark, A.E., 1995. "Job Satisfaction and Gender: Why Are Women so Happy at Work?," DELTA Working Papers 95-10, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  8. Moore, William J & Newman, Robert J & Turnbull, Geoffrey K, 1998. "Do Academic Salaries Decline with Seniority?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 352-66, April.
  9. Harman, Harry H., 1976. "Modern Factor Analysis," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 3, number 9780226316529, September.
  10. Booth, Alison L & Burton, Jonathan & Mumford, Karen, 2000. "The Position of Women in UK Academic Economics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages F312-33, June.
  11. Banerjee, Dyuti S. & Gaston, Noel, 2004. "Labour market signalling and job turnover revisited," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(5), pages 599-622, October.
  12. Machin, Stephen & Oswald, Andrew, 2000. "UK Economics and the Future Supply of Academic Economists," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages F334-49, June.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Vladimir Otrachshenko & Olga Popova, 2011. "Life (Dis)satisfaction and the Decision to Migrate: Evidence from Central and Eastern Europe," Working Papers 306, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
  2. Andrew E. Clark & Yarine Fawaz, 2009. "Valuing jobs via retirement: European evidence," Working Papers halshs-00566855, HAL.
  3. Mok, Penny & Mason, Geoff & Stevens, Philip & Timmins, Jason, 2012. "A Good Worker is Hard to Find: Skills Shortages in New Zealand Firms," Occasional Papers 12/5, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
  4. Antonio Di Paolo, 2012. "(Endogenous) occupational choices and job satisfaction among recent PhD recipients: evidence from Catalonia," Working Papers XREAP2012-21, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Dec 2012.

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