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I Would if I Could: Precarious Employment and Childbearing Intentions in Italy

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  • Francesca Modena

    ()

  • Fabio Sabatini

    ()

Abstract

This paper carries out an investigation into the socio-economic determinants of childbearing decisions made by couples in Italy. The analysis accounts for the characteristics of both possible parents. Our results do not support established theoretical predictions according to which the increase in the opportunity cost of motherhood connected to higher female labour participation is responsible for the fall in fertility. On the contrary, the instability of women’s work status (i.e. having occasional, precarious, and low-paid positions) is revealed as a significant dissuasive factor in the decision to have children. Couples in which there is an unemployed woman are less likely to plan childbearing as well. Other relevant explanatory variables are women’s age, men’s work status and education, women’s citizenship, marital status and perceived economic wellbeing.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 1013.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:trn:utwpde:1013

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Keywords: Fertility; family planning; parenthood; childbearing; participation; job instability; precarious employment; Italy.;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Modena, Francesca & Rondinelli, Concetta & Sabatini, Fabio, 2012. "Economic insecurity and fertility intentions: the case of Italy," MPRA Paper 36353, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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