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Clash of Career and Family. Fertility Decisions after Job Displacement

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Author Info

  • Del Bono, Emilia

    (ISER, University of Essex and IZA, Bonn)

  • Weber, Andrea

    (UC Berkeley and IHS Vienna, IZA, Bonn and CESifo)

  • Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf

    (University of Linz and IHS Vienna, IZA, Bonn and CEPR)

Abstract

In this paper we investigate how fertility decisions respond to unexpected career interruptions which occur as a consequence of job displacement. Using an event study approach we compare the birth rates of displaced women with those of women unaffected by job loss after establishing the pre-displacement comparability of these groups. Our results reveal that job displacement reduces average fertility by 5 to 10% in both the short and medium term (3 and 6 years) and that these effects are largely explained by the response of white collar women. Using an instrumental variable approach we provide evidence that the reduction in fertility is not due to the income loss generated by unemployment but arises because displaced workers undergo a career interruption. These results are interpreted in the light of a model in which the rate of human capital accumulation slows down after the birth of a child and all specific human capital is destroyed upon job loss.

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File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/eco/es-222.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Advanced Studies in its series Economics Series with number 222.

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Length: 61 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:222

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Keywords: Fertility; Unemployment; Plant closings; Human capital;

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