Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family

Contents:

Author Info

  • Goldin, Claudia

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/2943933/Goldin_QuietRevolution.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Harvard University Department of Economics in its series Scholarly Articles with number 2943933.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in American Economic Review
Handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:2943933

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Littauer Center, Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-2144
Fax: 617-495-7730
Web page: http://www.economics.harvard.edu/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Daysal, N. Meltem & Orsini, Chiara, 2014. "The Miracle Drugs: Hormone Replacement Therapy and Labor Market Behavior of Middle-Aged Women," IZA Discussion Papers 7993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. repec:dgr:uvatin:2009099 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Katja Maria Kaufmann & Matthias Messner & Alex Solis, 2013. "Returns to Elite Higher Education in the Marriage Market: Evidence from Chile," Working Papers 489, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  4. Campos-Vazquez, Raymundo M. & Velez, Roberto, 2013. "Female Labour Supply and intergenerational preference formation: Evidence for Mexico," MPRA Paper 48282, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Cecilia Castaño & María Caprile & Carlos Iglesias, 2008. "New work: Old barriers but new opportunities for women," Working Papers 05/08, Instituto Universitario de Análisis Económico y Social.
  6. Angèle Christin, 2010. "Gender and Highbrow Cultural Participation in the United States," Working Papers 1274, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies..
  7. Edward L. Glaeser & Yueran Ma, 2013. "The Supply of Gender Stereotypes and Discriminatory Beliefs," NBER Working Papers 19109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. González de San Román, Ainara & de la Rica, Sara, 2012. "Gender Gaps in Spain: Family Issues and the Career Development of College Educated Men and Women," IZA Discussion Papers 6978, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Black, Dan A. & Kolesnikova, Natalia & Taylor, Lowell J., 2014. "Why do so few women work in New York (and so many in Minneapolis)? Labor supply of married women across US cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 59-71.
  10. Irina Kalabikhina & Alla Tyndik, 2014. "Does current demographic policy in Russia impact on fertility of different educational groups?," Working Papers 0010, Moscow State University, Faculty of Economics.
  11. Claude Diebolt & Faustine Perrin, 2013. "The Foundations of Female Empowerment Revisited," Working Papers 06-13, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  12. Bulent Guler, 2013. "Dual Income Couples and Interstate Migration," 2013 Meeting Papers 898, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  13. Anne McDaniel & Thomas DiPrete & Claudia Buchmann & Uri Shwed, 2011. "The Black Gender Gap in Educational Attainment: Historical Trends and Racial Comparisons," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 889-914, August.
  14. Clark, Damon & Del Bono, Emilia, 2014. "The long-run effects of attending an elite school: evidence from the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  15. Min Qiang (Kent) Zhao & Joseph Kaboski & Francisco Buera, 2013. "Quantifying the Growth in Services: the Role of Skills, Scale, and Female Labor Supply," 2013 Meeting Papers 277, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  16. Thomas Leoni & Rainer Eppel, 2013. "Women's Work and Family Profiles over the Lifecourse and their Subsequent Health Outcomes. Evidence for Europe," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 28, WWWforEurope.
  17. Claude Diebolt & Faustine Perrin, 2014. "Growth Theories," Working Papers 02-14, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  18. Darolia, Rajeev, 2014. "Working (and studying) day and night: Heterogeneous effects of working on the academic performance of full-time and part-time students," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 38-50.
  19. L. Rachel Ngai & Barbara Petrongolo, 2013. "Gender Gaps and the Rise of the Service Economy," CEP Discussion Papers dp1204, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:2943933. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Reinhard Engels).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.