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Le conseguenze sociali della flessibilizzazione del mercato del lavoro in Italia

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  • Barbieri Paolo
  • Scherer Stefani
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    Abstract

    The article investigates the determinants and consequences of atypical jobs in Italy, using longitudinal micro-data and comparing North-South regions. We demonstrate that the "partial and targeted" labour market deregulation, as implemented in Italy since the '80s, did not solve the "high equality, low employment" problem of the Italian labour market. Moreover, flexibilisation enhanced a strong labour market segmentation that entrapped the younger cohorts in a secondary, sub-protected labour market filled with atypical jobs. In addition, our results show that the the expectation that the new forms of atypical employment could constitute a way to make the transition into stable employment - and to make it faster - is definitely misleading. On the opposite, we find serious risk of entrapment in "second, sub-protected L.M." at 35 years of age, namely for the less qualified. We address the point that - due to the way the national insurance-based welfare model works - the present situation appears at risk of further enhancing the inegalitarian tide.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Società editrice il Mulino in its journal Stato e mercato.

    Volume (Year): (2005)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 291-322

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    Handle: RePEc:mul:jl9ury:doi:10.1425/20484:y:2005:i:2:p:291-322

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    Cited by:
    1. Gabriella Berloffa & Francesca Modena, 2010. "Economic well-being in Italy: The role of income insecurity and intergenerational inequality," Working Papers 168, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Gabriele BALLARINO & Massimiliano BRATTI, 2006. "Fields of study and graduates? occupational outcomes in Italy during the 90s. Who won and who lost?," Departmental Working Papers 2006-17, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    3. Modena, Francesca & Sabatini, Fabio, 2010. "I Would if I Could: Precarious Employment and Childbearing Intentions in Italy," MPRA Paper 26117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Francesca Modena & Concetta Rondinelli & Fabio Sabatini, 2012. "Economic insecurity and fertility intentions: the case of Italy," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2012_18, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    5. Gabriella Berloffa & Paola Villa, 2007. "Inequality across cohorts of households: evidence from Italy," Department of Economics Working Papers 0711, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.

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