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African poverty through the lens of labor economics: Earnings & mobility in three countries

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  • Justin Sandefur
  • Pieter Serneels

Abstract

In this note we make use of embryonic labour market panel surveys of the urban sectors of Ghana and Tanzania, and a longer term survey from Ethiopia, to address some aspects of the determinants of earnings across the wage and self-employed and provide preliminary evidence on transitions across labour market states. We argue that the type of panel data presented here provides insights into the growth process in Africa and directly links to understanding the process of poverty reduction.

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File URL: http://www.gprg.org/pubs/workingpapers/pdfs/gprg-wps-060.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number GPRG-WPS-060.

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Date of creation: 01 Dec 2006
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:gprg-wps-060

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  1. Måns Söderbom & Francis Teal & Anthony Wambugu & Godius Kahyarara, 2004. "The Dynamics of Returns to Education in Kenyan and Tanzanian Manufacturing," Development and Comp Systems 0409041, EconWPA.
  2. Murphy, Kevin M. & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Scholarly Articles 3606235, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. Francis Teal & Geeta Kingdon & Justin Sandefur, 2005. "Labor Market Flexibility, Wages and Incomes in sub-Saharan Africa in the 1990s," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-030, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Soderbom, Mans & Teal, Francis & Wambugu, Anthony, 2005. "Unobserved heterogeneity and the relation between earnings and firm size: evidence from two developing countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 153-159, May.
  5. Dale T. Mortensen, 2005. "Wage Dispersion: Why Are Similar Workers Paid Differently?," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262633191, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Francis Teal & Justin Sandefur, 2010. "The Returns to Formality and Informality in Urban Africa," Economics Series Working Papers CSAE WPS/2010-03, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Francis Teal & Justin Sandefur & Neil Rankin, 2010. "Learning; Earning in Africa: Where are the Returns to Education High?," Economics Series Working Papers CSAE WPS/2010-02, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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