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Sibling Rivalry: A Look at Switzerland with PISA Data

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Author Info

  • Wolter, Stefan C.

    ()
    (University of Bern)

  • Coradi Vellacott, Maja

    ()
    (Kanton Zürich)

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the sibling size and birth-order effect on educational achievement in Switzerland on the basis of PISA data. We find an overall modest size and birth-order effect. The sibling size effect, however, is a product of a substantial and significant negative size effect for families with lower socio-economic status and foreign origin and a positive sibling size effect in small, native families with a high socio-economic status compared to singlechild families with the same background. Thus, subgroups of the population seem to be confronted with binding budget constraints, although education is free. The hypothesis that parents of larger families spend on average less time with their children is also tested and shows the expected negative effect of the sibling size. We present an extended version of the sibling size model that can account for these effects and discuss the consequences these results might have for social and educational policy. rder

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 594.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp594

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Related research

Keywords: sibling size; parental background; education; birth-order;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Bauer, Philipp C. & Riphahn, Regina T., 2004. "Heterogeneity in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment: Evidence from Switzerland on Natives and Second Generation Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 1354, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Muriel Meunier, 2006. "Fonctions de production éducationnelle: le cas de la Suisse," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(IV), pages 579–615, December.
  3. Alvarez, Jesus & Moreno, Vicente Garcia & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2007. "Institutional effects as determinants of learning outcomes : exploring state variations in Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4286, The World Bank.
  4. Fertig, Michael, 2003. "Who's to Blame? The Determinants of German Students' Achievement in the PISA 2000 Study," IZA Discussion Papers 739, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Bieber, Tonia, 2011. "Convergence through communication and competition? The internationalization of secondary and higher education policies in Switzerland," TranState Working Papers 147, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.
  6. Ludger W��mann, 2003. "European education production functions: what makes a difference for student achievement in Europe?," European Economy - Economic Papers 190, Directorate General Economic and Monetary Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  7. Michael Fertig, 2004. "What Can We Learn From International Student Performance Studies? Some Methodological Remarks," RWI Discussion Papers 0023, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
  8. Michael Fertig, 2003. "Who’s to Blame? The Determinants of German Students’ Achievement in the PISA 2000 Study," RWI Discussion Papers 0004, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.

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