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Schooling, Family Background, and Adoption: Is it Nature or is it Nurture?

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  • Plug, Erik

    ()
    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Vijverberg, Wim P.

    ()
    (CUNY Graduate Center)

Abstract

When parents are more educated, their children tend to receive more schooling as well. Does this occur because parental ability is passed on genetically or because more educated parents provide a better environment for children to flourish? Using an intergenerational sample of families, we estimate on the basis of a comparison of biological and adopted children that at most 65 percent of the parental ability is genetically transmitted.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 247.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2001
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Political Economy, 2003, 111 (3), 611-641
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp247

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Keywords: adoption; genetic transfers; human capital; Intergenerational mobility;

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  16. Shea, John, 2000. "Does parents' money matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 155-184, August.
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