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Left Behind: Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital in the Midst of HIV/AIDS

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  • Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude

    ()
    (Dalhousie University)

  • Turan, Belgi

    ()
    (University of Houston)

Abstract

This paper provides evidence on how adverse health conditions affect the transfer of human capital from one generation to the next. We explore the differential exposure to HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa as a substantial health shock to both household and community environment. We utilize the recent rounds of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for 11 countries in sub-Saharan Africa that provide information on mother’s HIV status and enable us to link mothers and their children. The data also allow us to distinguish between two separate channels that are likely to differentially affect the intergenerational transfers: mother’s HIV status and community HIV prevalence. First, we find that mothers transfer 37% of their human capital to their children in the developing economies in sub-Saharan Africa. Second, our results show that mother's HIV status has large detrimental effect on inheritability of human capital. HIV-infected mothers are 30% less likely to transfer their human capital to their children. Finally, focusing only on non-infected mothers and their children, we find that HIV prevalence in the community also significantly impairs the intergenerational human capital transfers even if mother is HIV negative. The findings of this paper is particularly distressing for these already poor, HIV-torn countries as in the future they will have even lower overall level of human capital due to the epidemic.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5166.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Population Economics, 2013, 26 (4), 1523-1547
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5166

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Keywords: intergenerational transmission; HIV/AIDS; human capital investment;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Chinhui Juhn & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Belgi Turan, 2013. "HIV and fertility in Africa: first evidence from population-based surveys," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 835-853, July.
  2. Jean-Noël Senne, 2014. "Death and schooling decisions over the short and long run in rural Madagascar," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 497-528, April.

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