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Family Background and Economic Outcomes in Japan

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  • Ken Yamada

    ()
    (School of Economics, Singapore Management University)

Abstract

There has been increasing concern about the influence of elements of family background on children’s future outcomes in Japan. This paper empirically examines the long-term impact of family background, including sibling composition and parental attributes, and reveals how these elements of Japanese women’s family backgrounds affect their educational attainment and investment, labor market outcomes, family formation, and spousal characteristics.

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File URL: https://mercury.smu.edu.sg/rsrchpubupload/18080/sibling_201110a.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Singapore Management University, School of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 23-2012.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: May 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in SMU Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series
Handle: RePEc:siu:wpaper:23-2012

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Keywords: sibling composition; family background; intergenerational correlations; family formation; assortative mating;

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References

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  1. Sandra E Black & Paul J Devereux, 2010. "Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility," Working Papers 201010, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  2. Booth, Alison L. & Kee, Hiau Joo, 2006. "Intergenerational Transmission of Fertility Patterns in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 2437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Masaru Sasaki, 2002. "The Causal Effect of Family Structure on Labor Force Participation among Japanese Married Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 429-440.
  4. Cheti Nicoletti & Marco Francesconi, 2006. "Intergenerational mobility and sample selection in short panels," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(8), pages 1265-1293.
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Cited by:
  1. Daiji Kawaguchi, 2013. "Fewer School Days, More Inequality," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd12-271, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  2. YAMAGATA Shinji & NAKAMURO Makiko & INUI Tomohiko, 2013. "Inequality of Opportunity in Japan: A behavioral genetic approach," Discussion papers 13097, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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