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Fewer School Days, More Inequality

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  • Daiji Kawaguchi

Abstract

This paper examines how the intensity of compulsory education affects the time use and academic achievement of children with different socioeconomic backgrounds. The impact is identified off the school-day reduction of Japan in 2002 that resulted when all Saturdays were set as public-school holidays. An analysis of time diaries and test scores before and after the school-day reduction reveals that the socioeconomic gradient of 9th graders' study time becomes 80% steeper and the socioeconomic gradient of academic achievements of 8th and 10th graders becomes 20-30% steeper. Intensive compulsory education contributes to equalizing the academic performances of children with different socioeconomic backgrounds.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series with number gd12-271.

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Date of creation: Jan 2013
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Handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd12-271

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Keywords: Compulsory Education; Inequality; Socioeconomic Gradient;

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  1. Dmytro Hryshko & María José Luengo‐Prado & Bent E. Sørensen, 2011. "Childhood determinants of risk aversion: The long shadow of compulsory education," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 2(1), pages 37-72, 03.
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  6. Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2008. "The gender-asymmetric effect of working mothers on children's education: Evidence from Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 586-604, December.
  7. Jungmin Lee & Daiji Kawaguchi & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2011. "Aggregate Impacts of a Gift of Time," NBER Working Papers 17649, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  13. Hojo, Masakazu & Oshio, Takashi, 2010. "What factors determine student performance in East Asia? New evidence from TIMSS 2007," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 494, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  14. Ueda Atsuko, 2009. "Intergenerational Mobility of Earnings and Income in Japan," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-27, December.
  15. Brunello, Giorgio & Weber, Guglielmo & Weiss, Christoph T., 2012. "Books Are Forever: Early Life Conditions, Education and Lifetime Income," IZA Discussion Papers 6386, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Supply-side socialism
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2013-03-11 14:32:11
  2. Reduce inequality by increasing the number of school days
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-03-27 14:02:00

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