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Sibling Rivalry in Educational Attainment: The German Case

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  • Bauer, Thomas K.

    ()
    (RWI)

  • Gang, Ira N.

    ()
    (Rutgers University)

Abstract

Recent studies exploring sibling rivalry in the allocation of household resources in the U.S. produce conflicting results. We contribute to this discussion by addressing the role of sibling rivalry in educational attainment in Germany. Using the German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP) we are able to distinguish how the effects of sibling rivalry vary by cultural affiliation, i.e., among families of West German, East German and foreign origin. We also point out and correct for a reference group problem in earlier papers analyzing sibling rivalry.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 180.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2000
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Labour, 2001, 15 (2), 237-255; see IZA Reprints 104/01
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp180

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Postal: IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
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Related research

Keywords: gender; sex composition; human capital formation; ethnicity; Education; minorities;

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References

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  1. Robert Kaestner, 1996. "Are Brothers Really Better? Sibling Sex Composition and Educational Achievement Revisited," NBER Working Papers 5521, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Ira N. Gang & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 1999. "Is Child Like Parent? Educational Attainment and Ethnic Origin," Departmental Working Papers 199614, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  3. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1986. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages S1-39, July.
  4. Behrman, Jere R & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Taubman, Paul, 1994. "Endowments and the Allocation of Schooling in the Family and in the Marriage Market: The Twins Experiment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1131-74, December.
  5. Thomas Bauer & Ira N. Gang, 1999. "Siblings, Their Sex Composition and Educational Attainment in Germany," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 68(2), pages 215-221.
  6. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1979. "An Equilibrium Theory of the Distribution of Income and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1153-89, December.
  7. Behrman, Jere R & Pollak, Robert A & Taubman, Paul, 1982. "Parental Preferences and Provision for Progeny," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(1), pages 52-73, February.
  8. Ashish Garg & Jonathan Morduch, 1998. "Sibling rivalry and the gender gap: Evidence from child health outcomes in Ghana," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 471-493.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Blaess, Virginie, 2005. "Siblings and Educational Attainment in West Germany," Discussion Papers 2005,001E, University of Erfurt, Faculty of Economics, Law and Social Sciences.
  2. Andersson, Fredrik & Konrad, Kai A, 2001. "Globalization and Human Capital Formation," CEPR Discussion Papers 2657, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Mahler, Philippe & Winkelmann, Rainer, 2004. "Single Motherhood and (Un)Equal Educational Opportunities: Evidence for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1391, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Claudia Sanhueza, 2009. "Family Size and Birth Order in Chile: Using Twins as a Natural Experiment," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv234, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
  5. Marcus Tamm, 2007. "Does Money Buy Higher Schooling?: Evidence from Secondary School Track Choice in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 41, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  6. Philipp Bauer & Regina Riphahn, 2007. "Heterogeneity in the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: evidence from Switzerland on natives and second-generation immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 121-148, February.
  7. Bauer, Philipp C. & Riphahn, Regina T., 2005. "Heterogenity in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment: Evidence from Switzerland on Natives and Second," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 38, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  8. Anders Holm & Mads Meier Jæger, 2005. "Relative Risk Aversion and Social Reproduction in Intergenerational Educational Attainment: Application of a Dynamic Discrete Choice Mode," CAM Working Papers 2006-04, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  9. Wolter, Stefan C. & Coradi Vellacott, Maja, 2002. "Sibling Rivalry: A Look at Switzerland with PISA Data," IZA Discussion Papers 594, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Regina Flake, 2011. "Gender Differences in the Intergenerational Earnings Mobility of Second-Generation Migrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 0283, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  11. Wolter, Stefan C., 2003. "Sibling Rivalry: A Six Country Comparison," IZA Discussion Papers 734, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Thomas Cornelissen & Uwe Jirjahn & Georgi Tsertsvadze, 2008. "Parental Background and Earnings: German Evidence on Direct and Indirect Relationship," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 228(5+6), pages 554-572, December.

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