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Career Changers in Teaching Jobs: A Case Study Based on the Swiss Vocational Education System

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Author Info

  • Hof, Stefanie

    ()
    (Swiss Co-ordination Center for Research in Education)

  • Strupler, Mirjam

    ()
    (University of Bern)

  • Wolter, Stefan C.

    ()
    (University of Bern)

Abstract

This study investigates the determinants and motives of professionals who change career to vocational teaching. The framework for this study is the Swiss vocational education system, which requires that teachers of vocational subjects must have a prior career in that specific field. Thus, to work in teaching, every vocational teacher has to change his or her initial career. This paper focuses on the relevance of monetary motives for changing a career to teaching. Using a unique data set of trainee teachers, we show that professionals who change their careers to teaching earned on average more in their first career than comparable workers in the same occupation. Our findings additionally demonstrate that the average career changer still expects to earn significantly more as a teacher than in the former career. However, the study shows substantial heterogeneity and a zero wage elasticity of the teacher supply, suggesting that non-monetary motives are more relevant for career change than monetary factors.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5806.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5806

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Related research

Keywords: career change; occupational change; rate of return to education; wage differentials; teacher wages; vocational education and training;

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  1. Stefan Denzler & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "Laufbahnentscheide im Lehrberuf aus bildungsökonomischer Sicht," Economics of Education Working Paper Series, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU) 0041, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
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  6. Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton & Steven McIntosh, 2002. "Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in the UK: An Analysis of Graduate Occupation Choice from the 1960s to the 1990s," CEE Discussion Papers, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE 0021, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
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  12. Wolter, Stefan C. & Ryan, Paul, 2011. "Apprenticeship," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier, Elsevier.
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  16. Stefan C. Wolter & Stefan Denzler & Bernhard A. Weber, 2003. "Betrachtungen zum Arbeitsmarkt der Lehrer in der Schweiz," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 72(2), pages 305-319.
  17. Wolter, Stefan C. & Denzler, Stefan, 2003. "Wage Elasticity of the Teacher Supply in Switzerland," IZA Discussion Papers 733, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  18. Hanushek, Eric A. & Pace, Richard R., 1995. "Who chooses to teach (and why)?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 101-117, June.
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