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Tasks and Heterogeneous Human Capital

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  • Shintaro Yamaguchi

Abstract

This article proposes a new approach to modeling heterogeneous human capital using task data from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The key feature of the model is that it departs from the Roy model, which treats occupations as distinct categories and conceives of occupations as bundles of tasks. The advantages of this approach are that it can accommodate many occupations without computational burden and provide a clear interpretation as to how and why skills are differently rewarded across occupations. The model is structurally estimated by the Kalman filter using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/662066
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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/662066
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 1 - 53

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/662066

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References

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  1. Shintaro Yamaguchi, 2008. "Career Progression and Comparative Advantage," Department of Economics Working Papers 2008-03, McMaster University.
  2. Sullivan, Paul, 2006. "Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations are Misclassified," MPRA Paper 862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Rubinstein, Yona & Weiss, Yoram, 2006. "Post Schooling Wage Growth: Investment, Search and Learning," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
  4. Teulings, Coen N, 1995. "The Wage Distribution in a Model of the Assignment of Skills to Jobs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 280-315, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Carl Sanders, 2012. "Skill Uncertainty, Skill Accumulation, and Occupational Choice," 2012 Meeting Papers 633, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. R. Romano & A. Tampieri, 2013. "Arts vs Engineering: The Choice among Consumption of and Investment in Education," Working Papers wp892, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  3. Chris Robinson, 2011. "Occupational Mobility, Occupation Distance and Specific Human Capital," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20115, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  4. Jonathan James, 2012. "Learning and occupational sorting," Working Paper 1225, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  5. Ronni Pavan, 2011. "Career Choice and Wage Growth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(3), pages 549 - 587.
  6. Susumu Imai & Derek Stacey & Casey Warman, 2011. "From Engineer to Taxi Driver? Occupational Skills and the Economic Outcomes of Immigrants," Working Papers 1275, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  7. Clark, Brian & Joubert, Clement & Maurel, Arnaud, 2014. "The Career Prospects of Overeducated Americans," IZA Discussion Papers 8313, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Pedro Silos & Eric Smith, 2012. "Human capital portfolios," Working Paper 2012-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  9. Laura Turner & Aloysius Siow & Gueorgui Kambourov, 2014. "Relationship Skills in the Labor and Marriage Markets," 2014 Meeting Papers 155, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Ronni Pavan & Josh Kinsler, 2012. "The Specificity of General Human Capital: Evidence from College Major Choice," 2012 Meeting Papers 1036, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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