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The Effect of Childhood Conduct Disorder on Human Capital

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Author Info

  • Koning, Pierre

    ()
    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Webbink, Dinand

    ()
    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Vujić, Sunčica

    ()
    (University of Bath)

  • Martin, Nicholas G.

    ()
    (Queensland Institute of Medical Research)

Abstract

This paper estimates the longer-term effects of childhood conduct disorder on human capital accumulation and violent and criminal behaviour later in life using data of Australian twins. We measure conduct disorder with a rich set of indicators based on diagnostic criteria from psychiatry. Using ordinary least squares (OLS) and twin fixed effects (FE) estimation approaches, we find that early (pre-18) conduct disorder problems significantly affect both human capital accumulation and violent and criminal behaviour over the life course. In addition, we find that conduct disorder is more deleterious if these behaviours occur earlier in life.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 4940.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: May 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Health Economics, 2012, 21 (8), 928–945
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4940

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Keywords: conduct disorder; human capital; twins;

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References

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  1. Jason M. Fletcher, 2008. "Adolescent depression: diagnosis, treatment, and educational attainment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(11), pages 1215-1235.
  2. James Heckman & Pedro Carneiro, 2003. "Human Capital Policy," NBER Working Papers 9495, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Heckman, James J. & Masterov, Dimitriy V., 2007. "The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children," IZA Discussion Papers 2725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg & Lindsey MacMillan, 2007. "Accounting for Intergenerational Income Persistence: Noncognitive Skills, Ability and Education," School of Economics Discussion Papers, School of Economics, University of Surrey 0307, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  5. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Child Development and Success or Failure in the Youth Labour Market," CEP Discussion Papers dp0397, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Currie, Janet & Tekin, Erdal, 2006. "Does Child Abuse Cause Crime?," IZA Discussion Papers 2063, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Miller, Paul W & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 1995. "What Do Twins Studies Reveal about the Economic Returns to Education? A Comparison of Australian and U.S. Findings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 586-99, June.
  8. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S37-64, October.
  9. Slade, Eric P. & Wissow, Lawrence S., 2007. "The influence of childhood maltreatment on adolescents' academic performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 604-614, October.
  10. Garces, E. & Thomas, D. & Currie, J., 2000. "Longer Term Effects of Head Start," Papers, RAND - Labor and Population Program 00-20, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  11. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2006. "The return to schooling: Estimates from a sample of young Australian twins," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 571-587, October.
  12. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2004. "Child Mental Health and Human Capital Accumulation: The Case of ADHD," NBER Working Papers 10435, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. James J. Heckman & Jora Stixrud & Sergio Urzua, 2006. "The Effects of Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities on Labor Market Outcomes and Social Behavior," NBER Working Papers 12006, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Jason Fletcher & Barbara L. Wolfe, 2007. "Child Mental Health and Human Capital Accumulation: The Case of ADHD Revisited," NBER Working Papers 13474, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Orley Ashenfelter & Alan Krueger, 1992. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 683, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  16. Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W. & Heath, Andrew C. & Martin, Nick, 2005. "Early childhood behaviours, schooling and labour market outcomes: estimates from a sample of twins," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-17, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dinand Webbink & Pierre Koning & Suncica Vujic & N. Martin, 2008. "Why are criminals less educated than non-criminals? Evidence from a cohort of young Australian twins," CPB Discussion Paper 114, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  2. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2011. "Estimating the relation between health and education: What do we know and what do we need to know?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 778-791, October.
  3. Donal O’Neill & Sinéad McGilloway & Michael Donnelly & Tracey Bywater & Paul Kelly, 2013. "A cost-effectiveness analysis of the Incredible Years parenting programme in reducing childhood health inequalities," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 85-94, February.
  4. Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Anton & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2011. "Does Early Life Health Predict Schooling Within Twin Pairs?," IZA Discussion Papers 5803, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Emanuele Millemaci & Dario Sciulli, 2011. "The causal effect of family difficulties during childhood on adult labour market outcomes," CEIS Research Paper, Tor Vergata University, CEIS 203, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 30 Jun 2011.
  6. Dinand Webbink & Nicholas Martin & Peter Visscher, 2011. "Does teenage childbearing reduce investment in human capital?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 701-730, April.

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