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Early Childhood Behaviours, Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes: Estimates from a Sample of Twins

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Author Info

  • Anh T. Le

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Paul W. Miller

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Andrew C. Heath

    (Department of Psychiatry and Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University)

  • Nick Martin

    (Queensland Institute of Medical Research)

Abstract

This paper examines the links between childhood conduct disorder problems and schooling and labour market outcomes net of genetic and environmental effects. The results show that individuals who experienced conduct disorder problems are more likely to leave school early, have poorer employment prospects and lower earnings. These findings are shown to be due to the genetic and environmental influences that are generally not considered in studies of schooling and labour market outcomes.

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File URL: http://www.biz.uwa.edu.au/home/research/discussionworking_papers/economics/2004?f=150992
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics in its series Economics Discussion / Working Papers with number 04-02.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:04-02

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Keywords: Childhood Behaviours; Educational Attainment; Unemployment; Employment; Wages;

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References

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  1. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Child development and success or failure in the youth labour market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20261, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Orley Ashenfelter & Alan Krueger, 1992. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," Working Papers 683, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S37-64, October.
  4. Neumark, David, 1999. "Biases in twin estimates of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 143-148, April.
  5. Miller, Paul W & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 1995. "What Do Twins Studies Reveal about the Economic Returns to Education? A Comparison of Australian and U.S. Findings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 586-99, June.
  6. Veall, Michael R & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1996. " Pseudo-R-[superscript 2] Measures for Some Common Limited Dependent Variable Models," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 241-59, September.
  7. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2006. "The return to schooling: Estimates from a sample of young Australian twins," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 571-587, October.
  8. Griliches, Zvi, 1976. "Wages of Very Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S69-85, August.
  9. Bound, John & Solon, Gary, 1999. "Double trouble: on the value of twins-based estimation of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 169-182, April.
  10. Borland, Jeff & Suen, Anthony, 1994. "The Experience-Earnings Profile in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 70(208), pages 44-55, March.
  11. Anh Le & Paul Miller, 2004. "School-leaving Decisions in Australia: A Cohort Analysis," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 39-65.
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