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Financing Business School Education: What Are the Economic Returns and Implications for Africa?

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  • Murinde, Victor
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    Abstract

    To be able to finance their physical assets and working capital costs, business schools mainly raise funds from any or a combination of the following: direct funding by the public sector or the government; income from providing educational services; debt (bank and bond); equity by private owners; public-private partnerships; research grants; and private sector endowment funds. This is a financing decision. But, it is the capital budgeting decision that matters! Business schools have to yield positive economic rates of return to become viable and attractive investment propositions; they must also yield positive non-pecuniary benefits. This paper provides a selective survey of the evidence on the core question of the rate of return to university education, and points out policy implications for business school education in Africa.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/30565
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM) in its series General Discussion Papers with number 30565.

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    Date of creation: 2001
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:idpmgd:30565

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    Related research

    Keywords: financing business school education; economic returns.; Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession;

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    1. Neumark, David, 1999. "Biases in twin estimates of the return to schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 143-148, April.
    2. Angrist, Joshua D & Krueger, Alan B, 1991. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(4), pages 979-1014, November.
    3. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-12, March.
    4. Chung, Yue-Ping, 1996. "Gender earnings differentials in Hong Kong: The effect of the state, education, and employment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 231-243, June.
    5. Psacharopoulos, George, 1989. "Time trends of the returns to education: Cross-national evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 225-231, June.
    6. Alan Krueger & Orley Ashenfelter, 1992. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," NBER Working Papers 4143, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Miller, Paul W & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 1995. "What Do Twins Studies Reveal about the Economic Returns to Education? A Comparison of Australian and U.S. Findings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 586-99, June.
    8. Dougherty, Christopher R. S. & Jimenez, Emmanuel, 1991. "The specification of earnings functions: Tests and implications," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 85-98, June.
    9. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S37-64, October.
    10. Menon, Maria Eliophotou, 1997. "Perceived rates of return to higher education in Cyprus," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 425-430, October.
    11. Behrman, Jere R & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Taubman, Paul, 1994. "Endowments and the Allocation of Schooling in the Family and in the Marriage Market: The Twins Experiment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1131-74, December.
    12. Ryoo, Jai-Kyung & Nam, Young-Sook & Carnoy, Martin, 1993. "Changing rates of return to education over time: A Korean case study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 71-80, March.
    13. Jeff Grogger & Eric Eide, 1995. "Changes in College Skills and the Rise in the College Wage Premium," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 280-310.
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