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Child Mental Health and Human Capital Accumulation: The Case of ADHD

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  • Janet Currie
  • Mark Stabile

Abstract

One in five U.S. youngsters has a mental disorder, but we know little about the effects of these disorders on outcomes. We examine U.S. and Canadian children with symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the most common child mental health problem. Our innovations include the use of large nationally representative samples of children, the use of questions administered to all children rather than focusing only on diagnosed cases, and the use of sibling fixed effects to control for omitted variables. We find large negative effects on test scores and schooling attainment suggesting that mental health conditions are a more important determinant of average outcomes than physical health conditions.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 10435.

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Date of creation: Apr 2004
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Publication status: published as Currie, Janet & Stabile, Mark, 2006. "Child mental health and human capital accumulation: The case of ADHD," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 1094-1118, November.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10435

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  1. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Child development and success or failure in the youth labour market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 20261, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Julie Berry Cullen, 1999. "The Impact of Fiscal Incentives on Student Disability Rates," NBER Working Papers 7173, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2007. "Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 145-162.
  4. Janet Currie & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1998. "Health, Health Insurance and the Labor Market," JCPR Working Papers, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research 27, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  5. Richard Frank & Paul Gertler, 1991. "An Assessment of Measurement Error Bias for Estimating the Effect of Mental Distress on Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 154-164.
  6. Alison Evans Cuellar & Sara Markowitz & Anne M. Libby, 2003. "The Relationships between Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment and Juvenile Crime," NBER Working Papers 9952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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