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Time - Even More Costly Than Money: Training Costs of Workers and Firms

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  • Simone Tuor

    ()
    (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

  • Uschi Backes-Gellner

    ()
    (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

Abstract

We empirically investigate the joint training decisions of workers and firms. The aim of our study is to learn how various cost components affect workers’ (non-)participation in training. In particular, we separately consider monetary and non-monetary training costs, which is possible thanks to an especially rich dataset that includes both participants and non-participants. Our estimation results show that workers whose firms cover some of their training costs would generally be more likely to have assumed the full training costs themselves had they not received employer support. Moreover, the share of self-financed training, as compared to employer-supported training, is generally low. Thus, firms moderate virtually all training decisions and, as a result, considerably influence (non-)participation patterns. Interestingly, although training non-participation can be attributed to both monetary and non-monetary costs, the latter seem to comprise the more binding restriction. That is, time is more costly than money.

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File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0046_lhwpaper.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU) in its series Economics of Education Working Paper Series with number 0046.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0046

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Keywords: Training costs; employer-supported training; time vs. money;

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References

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  1. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L, 2001. "Learning and Earning: Do Multiple Training Events Pay? A Decade of Evidence from a Cohort of Young British Men," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 379-400, August.
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  3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1999. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages F112-42, February.
  4. Greenhalgh, C. & Mavrotas, G., 1992. "The Role of Career Aspirations and Financial Constraints in Individual Access to Vocational Training," Economics Series Working Papers 99136, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2003. "Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  7. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Lisa M. Lynch & Sandra E. Black, 1998. "Beyond the incidence of employer-provided training," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 64-81, October.
  9. Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1998. "Unravelling Supply and Demand Factors in Work-Related Training," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(2), pages 266-83, April.
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  12. Simon Janssen & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2008. "Skill obsolescence, vintage effects and changing tasks," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0063, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  13. Rosen, Sherwin, 1976. "A Theory of Life Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S45-67, August.
  14. Uschi Backes-Gellner & Simone N. Tuor, 2010. "Avoiding Labor Shortages by Employer Signaling: On the Importance of Good Work Climate and Labor Relations," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(2), pages 271-286, January.
  15. Wim Groot, 1999. "Productivity effects of enterprise-related training," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(6), pages 369-371.
  16. Hashimoto, Masanori, 1981. "Firm-Specific Human Capital as a Shared Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 475-82, June.
  17. Booth, Alison L & Zoega, Gylfi, 2001. "Is Wage Compression a Necessary Condition for Firm-Financed General Training?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2845, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  18. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
  19. Edward P. Lazear, 2003. "Firm-Specific Human Capital: A Skill-Weights Approach," NBER Working Papers 9679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Görlitz, Katja & Rzepka, Sylvi, 2014. "Does Regional Training Supply Determine Employees' Training Participation?," IZA Discussion Papers 8101, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Claudia Burgard, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 0320, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

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