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Training in Europe

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  • Wiji Arulampalam

    (University of Warwick,)

  • Alison L. Booth

    (Australian National University,)

  • Mark L. Bryan

    (University of Essex,)

Abstract

Using the European Community Household Panel, we investigate gender differences in training participation over the period 1994-1999. We focus on lifelong learning, fixed-term contracts, part-time versus full-time work, public/private sector affiliation, and educational attainment. Women are typically no less likely than men to train. While there is no significant training-age profile for women, there is a negative profile for men. In several countries there is a negative association between fixed-term contacts and training, particularly for men. In most countries and, for both sexes, training is positively associated with public sector employment and high educational attainment. (JEL: J16, J24, J40) Copyright (c) 2004 The European Economic Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 2 (2004)
Issue (Month): 2-3 (04/05)
Pages: 346-360

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:2:y:2004:i:2-3:p:346-360

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